Day 150
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Home Educaton Program

Day 150

Good Morning Folks! I hope you had a nice Easter! Grandma would be ok if she would learn to save information early. I am retyping a lot of information for you that was typed earlier this morning for Monday's lessons. Therefore, I hope I do as well a job as it was before. Grandma is going to be giving you material in lessons from now on through the end of the year and on into the summer if possible. She hopes to cover material from Patricia's book and a list of her own books used.
Please keep up the work of your tasks; Childrobotics; physical education of (sports or dancing) or health education for the body as(eyes, teeth, ears, skin, bones, muscles, or organs, what give us the necessary nutrients, food, plants, etc.); Reading and Language through ABC's, words, vocabulary, spelling, papers, etc.; along with Writing and Journals; Newspapers; Yearbooks; Family scrapbooks and recipes.
To start today's lessons out Grandma is going to cover half of Acts, today's History coverage of at least Monday, maybe more. Then she has two books to cover. Some math and art may be covered in these lessons. Be sure to keep up with any necessary Geometry and Algebra covered in video's Grandma has given you. She will try to cover the Algebra book she has as much as she can at sometime. Please take care and keep joining me. I will probably be covering other real estate and information later as possible.
 
To begin lessons for Monday Grandma is covering The Introduction to Acts in the Bible through Faith Alive and the first 12 chapters. The Introduction in Faith Alive goes as follows:
"Whom...did God inspire to write this book? Luke, the physician who traveled as a missionary with Paul, and who also wrote the Gospel of Luke, wrote this book.
For Whom...was this book first written? As with his Gospel, Luke wrote this book for a man named Theophilus. He may also have used it as evidence in court to defend Paul. Nevertheless, it really is for everyone.
When...did this happen? This book tells what happened from about AD 30 to 61.
Where...did this happen? The things in this book happened in many important cities in the Roman Empire.
How...does Acts show us God/s love? Acts show that God wants the saving message of Jesus to go out to all the world. The apostles began this work. Every step of the way, the Holy Spirit was with them to guide them and give their words power so that many believed.
What...special messages does this book give us? It describes the acts, or actions, of Jesus' apostles after Jesus has ascended back to heaven. It shows how God enables his people through the Holy Spirit to share the Good News of Jesus.
        ...action happens in this book? Jesus ascends back to heaven but sends the Holy Spirit at Pentecost. The Spirit inspires Jesus' apostles to preach about him on exciting and dangerous missionary journeys.
        ...important people do we meet? Peter and Paul are among the main characters in this book.
        ...are some of the stories in this book?
 
                       Jesus goes to heaven.                             Acts  1:1-11
                  The Holy Spirit comes.                                 Acts  2:1-13
  Peter heals a crippled beggar.                                       Acts  3:1-10
     Peter and John are arrested.                                      Acts  4:1-31
           Stephen, the first martyr.                                     Acts  6:8-8:1
                     Saul is converted.                                     Acts  9:1-31
                     Peter has a vision.                                    Acts 10:1-48
            Peter escapes from prison.                                 Acts 12:1-19
              Paul goes on a mission.                                   Acts 13:1-14:28
             The first church council.                                    Acts 15:1-29
                      Prisoners freed.                                       Acts 16:16-40
                   A riot in Ephesus.                                       Acts 19:23-41
                   Paul goes on trial.                                       Acts 24:1-27
              Paul is shipwrecked.                                        Acts 27:1-44
                  Paul goes to Rome.                                     Acts 28:1-31"
 
Now begin by reading the Bible Acts 1 through 12 and doing things given to you from Faith Alive as follows:
"Let's Live It! Acts 1:8 Power to Witness--Read Acts 1:8. Jesus promised to give his followers power to witness. "Witnessing" means telling others what we know about Jesus.
Ask your mom or dad to let you have a size "D" battery to symbolize power. Print John 3:16 on a piece of paper, and tape it to the battery. Carry the battery with you. When people ask you what it is, let them read the verse. Pray when you go out with your battery that the Holy Spirit will give you power to witness, and that your friends will believe in Jesus.
Did You Know? Acts 2:1 What was Pentecost? Pentecost was a Jewish holy day. Fifty days after Easter (Pentecost means "fiftieth"), God gave the disciples the Holy Spirit. The Spirit enabled them to speak in foreign languages and set flames of fire over their heads. When many people gathered to see what was happening, Peter preached to them about Jesus. This may be called the birthday of the Christian church.
Let's Live It! Acts 2:42-47 Power to Love--The first Christians loved each other very much because they knew how much God had first loved them. Read Acts 2:42-47. Find in these verses at least five things the early Christians did to show love for each other.
Look at the list you just made. Think of ways like these that you can show God's love to others. For example, how can you give to someone in need?
Did You Know? Acts 3:6 How were Peter and John able to heal? God gave Peter and John special power. When they healed in Jesus' name, it proved that Jesus really was the Son of God. After healing, Peter preached a sermon and told the people that Jesus was their Savior.
Let's Live It? Acts 4:23-31 Prayer For God's Power--When Peter and John were threatened they asked God for power to do miracles and keep on preaching. Read Acts 4:23-31. Because they knew God had been in control already at creation and at the time of David, they were certain he was still in control and still answering prayer.
Ask your mom or dad what they know about God that makes them sure he can answer prayer. Tell them about what you discovered in this Bible story.
When you pray, it is a good idea to begin as the disciples did, thanking God for his great power and telling him you know he can answer your prayers.
Did You Know? Acts 5:3 What was the sin of Ananias and Sapphira? Ananias and Sapphira lied. The money they got from selling some land was theirs to use any way they wanted, but they agreed to lie to the church. Lying to the church is like lying to God, and God punished them.
Let's Live It! Acts 7:54-60 Facing Fear--Stephen kept on preaching Christ and became the first person to die for it, the church's first martyr. Read Acts 7:54-60. How did God give Stephen courage?
Picture a situation where people might be angry with you for saying what you believe. Now picture Jesus standing in heaven. Keep that picture in mind when you face fear. He's standing with you!
Life In Bible Times-Stoning Stephen-The Hebrew people executed criminals by throwing heavy stones at them. Stephen was the first Christian martyr. A martyr (MAR-ter) is a person who is put to death because of his or her beliefs. Stephen was stoned because he preached about Jesus.
Did You Know? Acts 8:9 What is sorcery? Sorcery is a kind of magic. It is supposed to gie a person power over others. A sorcerer named Simon saw the power Jesus" apostles had and wanted that power for himself. He offered the apostles money for that power.
Did You Know? Acts 9:1 Who was Saul? The Saul of the New Testament was a Pharisee who hated Christians. After Jesus spoke to Saul, Saul became a Christian. Later, Saul became known by his Greek name, Paul. Paul became the greatest missionary of all time and wrote thirteen books of the New Testament.
Life In Bible Times-Paul In A Basket-Grain and other crops were stored in very large woven baskets. These baskets were able to use one to let him down over the city wall of Damascus.
Let's Live It! Acts 9:1-31 A New Look--Read Acts 9:1-31. Look carefully at the kind of person Saul was before he was converted (Acts 9:20-22,27-28)?
Draw "before" and "after" pictures of Paul's face. How do you think Paul looked when he hated Christians? How do you think Paul looked when he loved Jesus and wanted others to love Jesus too?
Did you know that you once looked like your "before" picture of Saul? At least your heart did. By nature we're all evil, but when Jesus made you his child, he changed all that. Show someone your new face--with the loving smile of a believer in Jesus!
Did You Know? Acts 10:17 Why did God send Peter a vision? In New Testament times the Jewish people did not associate with non-Jews. God gave Peter a vision of animals to teach him that it was all right to go to a non-Jew's home.
Did You Know? How did Peter escape from prison? An angel let Peter out of his chains and led him outside the jail. All Peter's friends were praying for him; but when Peter came to their door, they wouldn't believe it was him!
 
Today is April 21 as given in the Calendar History from Book (1) there are four birthdays and five history events. The first birthday is in 1782 for Friedrich Froebel, German educator and founder of the first kindergarten; the next is in 1816 for Charlotte Bronte, English novelist; a third is in 1926 for Queen Elizabeth II, British monarch. The last is in 1838 for John Muir, American naturalist. Under Environmental pioneer in Book (1) it says, "At the age of 28, John Muir was blinded in a factory accident. He vowed to devote himself to nature if he ever recovered his sight. Weeks later his sight returned, and Muir spent the rest of his life keeping his promise. He hiked thousands of miles across the United States and kept detailed drawings and journal accounts of his observations. Believing that human greed was destroying the environment to establish national parks. Ask your students what they think Muir meant when he said, "The clearest way into the universe is through a forest wilderness.""
The first event for Monday happened in 753 BC; According to legend, Rome was founded by Romulus and Remus. Then in 1789 John Adams was sworn in as the First U.S. Vice President. In 1790 Twenty-thousand people--the largest public gathering American had seen--attended Benjamin Franklin's Funeral in Philadelphia. In 1843 Hogs were prohibited from running wild in Chicago. In 1898 The Spanish-American War began. Also in 1898 Billy Duggleby became the only major league baseball player to hit a Grand Slam Home Run his first time at bat.
It is also considered Kartini Day in (Indonesia) and Kindergarten Day for which Book (1) says, "To celebrate Kindergarten Day, have your (children) create a list of favorite toys and games, activities, foods, routines, and events they enjoyed in kindergarten. Then have the kids interview children currently attending kindergarten and make a list of their favorite activities. Finally, ask your (children) to compare the two lists.
 
Grandma is going to cover two stories for the day of things you can do to cover our lesson finishing Russia and to work on the American (Colonial) times:
 
The first book given in Grandma's book (6) is called The Quilt Story by Tony Johnston (G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1985. 28 pp.)
In warm poetic text, this book recounts the life of an heirloom quilt. It also tells of two little girls who, though separated by generations, were united in the comfort of the same quilt. It is a different "take" on a similar theme to that of The Keeping Quilt (to be read also and be given material for) and may be read before or after that story. The two stories together might be the basis for a "Quilt" unit.
 
Before Reading The Quilt Story
  • Ask the children if their family (or someone they know) owns something that has been passed down from generation to generation. Remind the children that such an heirloom need not be expensive, but it does need to hold special meaning to the people who keep it. Tell the children that The Quilt Story is about such an heirloom. Ask the children to listen carefully to see if they can decide why the heirloom is so special to the characters in the story.
 
After Reading The Quilt Story
  • Ask the children to describe the quilts they may have seen. Show the children pictures of different types of popular quilt patterns (featured today even in mail order catalogs). (If the children have already read The Keeping Quilt, this may be unnecessary.) Tell the children that quilting is now considered  an American folk art, but that the pioneer women who first sewed quilts did so to make the most of fabric scraps(note the old socks sewn into the quilt in The Quilt Story), (Grandma wants to make a notation here not thought about is the fact that money might come easier today, but in the time of pioneers money was very scarce and the utilized things a lot more than some do today. Therefore, making quilts was a way to have warmth by not only utilizing left over clothes and material it would also have cost them a big part of savings to buy those things. Many families did trade things for warm wool or in Mexico they make some very beautiful and warm blankets as well as the Native American blankets that would save people a lot on electricity for electric blankets as well as their costs. Both quilts and these blankets cannot compare to the warmth of the all American blankets known from experience. However, there were many ways people were kept warm and my mother in the time of the depression remembers as a young girl living with her grandparents of having to chop wood and start a fire in the morning to dress by.) and to bring warmth and color to their sparse, plain homes and rough lies. Ask the children to list all the ways that Abigail used the quilt. How many of the children in (your home) have a favorite blanket or soft toy from their own childhood? Would these possessions make for good heirlooms? Do children of other cultures have favorite toys or possessions? How can the children find out this information?
 
Follow-up Activities
 
American Folk Toys
Secure a copy of  The Foxfire Book of Toys and Games (E. P. Dutton, 1985), or any other book featuring a collection of American folk toys and games. Show your (children) the pictures of the toys which date back more than 200 years to colonial days (and beyond!). Have the class decide how their modern toys are similar to or different from the folk toys (which have no batteries, no electricity, few moving parts and are for the most part homemade). Have the children interview their parents and grandparents to discover what kinds of toys they played with. Did they, too, have a special blanket or toy that they played with for a long time? Were their toys (or blankets or clothes) ever homemade?
 
Folk Art Museum
Have children assemble a folk art museum by bringing in to (your church, from your homes, or relatives homes, or somewhere they could be) items reminiscent of colonial times. These may include quilts, toys, jewelry, pictures, tools, gadgets, knick-knacks, etc. (Because of the recent interest in using American folk art for decorating our modern homes, it should not be difficult to gather a collection together.) Label and display the pieces together in a central place....For more information of quilting, toy making, and colonial times, see Colonial America (Cooperative Learning Activities) by Sue Schneck and Mary Strohl (Scholastic, 1991).
(Another Idea Grandma has is to visit a local Museum that could have pioneer things in it. If you do not live near one or want to visit one like the ones in Nebraska it is well worth your visit.)
 
Schoolhouse Quilting Bee
Use quilting books such as 101 patchwork Patterns by Rudy McKim (Dover, 1962) to familiarize children with the schoolhouse quilt pattern. (Grandma says, "it is like a house with a front view with windows and a door; then a larger side view with windows.) Remind children that quilts were often completed by groups of people working together at a social gathering known as a "quilting bee." Each quilter would work on one portion of the quilt, but no individual effort appeared as great as when all the pieces were joined together. Invite each of the children (other relatives, family members, or friends) to create one block for a classroom "schoolhouse quilt.""
If you do not want to spend the time using material and doing it together, felt pieces or paper pieces can be used also but they will not be as nice as real material or from old clothing. Nor will the Pot holders, aprons, etc. Grandma is going to add to the product line.
When finished with your picture, one side can be glued or sewed onto a log or stick with string on the ends to be hung somewhere.
 
 
The other mentioned we will be given activities for today is Russian-American called The Keeping Quilt by Patricia Polacco (Simon and Schuster, 1988, 32 pp.)
This book recounts the story of an heirloom quilt, crafted from a basket of old clothes including Uncle Vladimir's shirt, Aunt Havalah's nightdress, and an apron of Aunt Natasha's. Once completed, the quilt is passed down through four generations in a family. For nearly a century, the quilt serves such purposes as a Sabbath tablecloth, a wedding canopy, and a baby receiving blanket. The quilt is also a constant reminder of--and tribute to--family loved ones back home in Russia.
 
Before Reading The Keeping Quilt
  • Review these terms with the class: generation, heirloom, inheritance, legacy. Then, have the children describe any items that have been passed down from generation to generation in their families, such as houses, furniture, dishes, artwork, toys, etc. Remind the children that such legacies needn't be items worth a lot of money. Items such as photographs, knickknacks, clothing and toys may also be handed down from generation to generation--and may be worth more to the receiver than any sum of money! Tell the children that The Keeping Quilt is a story of just such a legacy.
 
After Reading The Keeping Quilt
  • Invite students to take a close look at the artwork in the book. What do they notice about the use of color? Have the class make a list of possible reasons why the author/illustrator chose to use color so carefully? Ask: How would the book appear different if each of the illustrations was in full color? Why is the quilt so valuable to the author/illustrator? Would the quilt be as valuable to us? Why or why not?
 
Follow-up Activities"
 
Make a ...Quilt or Make a Family Quilt
If you do not want to tie this to the other story and make a quilt together or both quilts together with the story out of material or old clothing or make your own version like one Grandma wants to make out of my Granddaughter's fancy sweatshirts she grew out of; you can make one following Book (6)'s instructions. There are lots of ideas for quilts and quilts books available to use if you are interested. Quilts can be donated to hospitals, nursing homes, homeless shelters or day care centers. Grandma has made a few from squares of material in the way given below and from jeans which are very heavy and warm.
"To begin, provide each child with two plain pieces of copy paper (each trimmed to 8 1/2" square) and fabric crayons (available in craft stores). Instruct each child to use the crayons and one piece of paper to draw something they care about or value in their lives (e.g., a toy, a book, a pet, something in nature, etc.). On the other piece of paper, have children trace one of their hands and color it in. You or another adult can then use an iron to transfer the drawing onto individual squares of fabric (approximately 10" square) or onto a white or pastel solid-colored flat sheet. (Directions on the crayon box will guide your fabric and sheet selection.) The dimensions of the quilt will depend on the number of" (children working on the quilt-you may have to do several pieces each-you could form just a border with strips of the squared together and a plain piece in the middle also. Otherwise it would take 48 squares to form it 6 squares by 8 squares for each quilt.) You can stitch the square pieces together by machine or by hand following the sewing instructions on one of the books. Do not worry too much about exactness. When your top is all finished, "pin the top of the quilt to a batting baking (available in craft and fabric stores), (or as Grandma figures an old clean blanket cleaned in Pine sol disinfectant), and show the children how to stitch around their fabric designs, thus creating a quilted effect. When completed, cover the quilt top with a second sheet or fabric piece trimmed to fit the quilt top. Use effect. Turn the quilt right side out, tuck the raw ends inside, and, finally, stitch the fourth side closed.
 
Legacies and Inheritances
Have (the children) think about what they would like to hand down to someone they love. Have (the children) also think about the gifts they have inherited from their ancestors. Remind children that an inheritance need not be something expensive or even something you can touch. Rather, it can also be a lesson learned from someone loved, a way of being, or a special time spent together. Use (plain pieces of paper) to have children first draw what they have inherited or what they might hand down, and then write a brief description of why the legacy or inheritance is so important to them. If children are tempted to write abbreviated descriptions (e.g., "I like the book Aunt Sara gave me because it's nice."), encourage students to use sensory imagery ("it feels like, it looks like, it smells like, etc.") to tell specifically why the gift was nice and what it reminds them of.
 
Learning Legacy
Traditionally, many graduating classes write a "Last Will and Testament" that then appears in their yearbook or school paper. Although this tradition is usually something of a lampoon of things and people in the school, you can adapt it to help your (children) understand legacies and inheritances better. Invite (your children) to brainstorm the best experiences they had as a (family)  this year, what they learned, etc., and write them on a "scroll" to be passed on as a legacy."

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