Day 161
The Best Place to Learn From - Is The Best Place for Learning
RSS

Recent Posts

home set-up
Thoughts on Homeschooling
Rest of Summer August Calendar History
More of Calendar History for Summer August
First Part of August Summer Lessons

Categories

animals
arrangments
art
bridal, wedding, formal wear
Centers or areas of learning
children
clothing
crafts
dancing
decorating
dolls
edible and food
edible flowers and food
etiquette
flowers
GMO's and Monsanto
History
Home schooling
houses
insects
language
learning
math
news
organic
parents
parties
plants
quilts
reading
real estate investing
Science
sewing
Social Studies
songs and music
supplies
writing
powered by

Home Educaton Program

Day 161

The first Impressionist picture of Mary Cassatt for learning as explained in the Calendar History at the bottom of the blog.Good Morning! Grandma is going to be very busy the next few days giving you materials to finish lessons with. To begin with Grandma will give you the rest of Little House on the Prairie and move into The Gift of the Sacred Dog, Three Names, and Stone Fox from the Geography book. Then Grandma will give you some on South America and finish the Bible. She will also give you the months September, October, November, December for 1800's and 1900's. Then January and February for the 1900's. She will fit in 6 experiments for each of the days. This will all be given by the end of the week if I have no more disasters.
 
The first exercise sheet to be done for Little House on the Prairie from Grandma's book (185) is called Medal of Honor. It has a medal on a ribbon formed in a square holding these fill in sentences. It says "There are many heroes in this story. Tell who does each brave thing below by writing Ma, Pa, Laura, or Jack in the blank." It has pictures of them under the ribbon square. They are also suppose to write about what Mr. Edwards does that is brave.
 
 
 
                
 
                       1.______________________leads the ponies across the creek.
 
                       2. _____________________drives the wagon across the creek.
 
                       3. ______________________almost drowns, but finds the family.
 
                       4. ______________________puts out the fire in the chimney.
 
                       5. ______________________pulls Mary and Baby Carrie away from the fire.
 
                       6. ______________________saves Mr. Scott's life.
 
                       7. ______________________gets water for Mary when she is very sick.
 
 
 
The next exercise activity is called Pioneer Words. It says, "Complete each sentence by filling in the (crossword) puzzle with items that were used by the pioneers. The words in the log (Grandma has at the top of this page) might help you. (The Crossword puzzle is placed in a log house.)
 
 
                  panniken                            sills                            bedstead
 
          petticoat                   latch                       pegs                           windlass
 
 
 
 
 
 
Across
2. (8 letters) Pa builds a ____where
   he and Ma sleep.
5. (5 letters starting at the third letter of
    3 down and goes through 1 down on the
    fourth letter) Pa makes a _____to keep
    the door closed.
6. (8 letters and starts down further under
    the 2nd question the 5 letter of 4 down,
    that starts 1 square space below the
    line of 2 across. 6 also goes through
    the 8th letter of 1 down. It is also
    running past 3 down 1 square space
    above it.) Pa lowers buckets into the
    well on a _______.
7. (4 letters long running through the
     seventh letter of 4 down.) Instead
     of nails, Pa uses wooden ______.
 
Down
1. (Starts a square above 2 across and
     goes 6th letter of word 2. It is nine
     letters long and goes through 5 across
     on 5's 3rd letter as well as 6's 6th
     letter.) Laura wears a _____ under her
     dress.
3. (Starts on the 4th letter of 2 and goes
     through the first letter of 5 across. It is
     5 letters long.) Pa starts building the
     house with two big logs called ______.
4. (Starts a square space below the 2nd
     letter of 2 across. Its 5th letter goes
     through 6 across on 6's 2nd letter.
     4 down is 8 letters long.) Ma keeps
     soap in a wooden box called a ______.
 
It asks, "What does Ma use to iron the girls' dresses?"_____________________________________
 
 
 
 
 
The next exercise page is called Animals of the Prairie. Laura and Mary love to watch the animals
that live on the prairie. Label each animal that the girls see. Choose from the names in the box."
(Grandma gives them at the top of this page. Below the words are pictures of the animals they have
seen. Maybe the children can take the words given to them and draw pictures of each one.)
 
                  mustang                    gophers                      wolf
 
     jack rabbit                    fawn                      panther
 
"What bird says good-bye to Laura and her family when they leave the prairie?
 
The Next exercise page is called Happy Times. The page has a picture of a milking cow kicking Pa.
The next picture on the other side of the page halfway down shows the family watching and Pa playing fiddle to someone dancing. The last picture back to the left side in the bottom corner is of a silver cup, tow cookies, jelly beans, and candy canes. The children are to tell about the happy things that happened to Laura and her family on the prairie.
 
 
 
The last exercise page in Grandma's book (185) is called a Daily Journal. The children are to pretend they are crossing the prairie, like Laura, in a covered wagon. They are to write a page in their journal, telling about what happens in a day either from the book or a made-up event of their own.
 
It also says to write why Laura feels sad to leave the little house, but she is also excited.
 
Book (185) has some Art Activities called Homemade Fun. It says, "The only toys pioneer children had to play with were toys they made themselves, like Laura's and Mary's rag dolls. In keeping with the spirit of long ago, invite students to make their own toys, too, (as a rag doll).
 
"Homemade Yo-Yo...
You Need: empty thread spools; medium-sized pieces of string, 2 1/2 feet long; lids from cottage-cheese or yogurt containers."
 
  1. For each yo-yo use a spool, a piece of string, and two lids.
  2. Show how to thread one end of the string through the spool and then to tie it to the string.
  3. Wrap the string once around the spool and tie it tightly in the same place where they made the first knot.
  4. Tie a loop for their fingers in the other end of the string. Then wrap the rest of the string around the spool.
  5. Decorate the two lids the way they want them with markers, glued pieces of paper, shapes, characters, stickers, etc. Then glue the two lids to the ends of the spools.
 
"Button-and-String Game. Challenge (the children) to see how long they can make their buttons spin.
You need: large two-holed buttons; string
 
  1. Give each (child) a string, about 30 inches long, and a button.
  2. Tell (the children) to thread one end of the string through one hole of the button, and the other end through the other button hole. Then tie the ends together.
  3. Show the (children) how to play the button-and-string game. Put your fingers through the string so that it is taut with the button in the middle. Wind up the string by swinging it toward you in a circular motion about 25 times. When you pull your hands apart, the button will spin on the twisted string. Move your hands in and out with the rhythm of the twisting string to keep the button spinning.
 
 
Button-in-the-Cup The following homemade toy will challenge (the children) hand-eye coordination.
You Need: string; wooden clothespins; buttons; tacks; egg cartons; paints and brushes
  1. Cut the egg cartons into separate cups. Give each (child) one egg-carton cup, one clothespin, one button, and one piece of string, about 12 inches long.
  2. Show students how to tie one end of the string around the top of the clothespin.
  3. Have (the children) thread the other end of the string through the button hole and tie a knot.
  4. Let (the children) paint their egg-carton cups. When the cups are dry, help each (child) tack the bottom of the cup to the top of the clothespin.
  5. Show the (children) how to play the game. Holding the clothespin, swing the button and try to catch it in the egg-carton cup."
 
 
The next page of activities in Grandma's book is for Cooperative Learning Activities working as groups. Grandma is going to give it  a little twist. One thing this page points out is how hard it was for the natives and the pioneers to communicate. Many men were as stubborn as some men are today. There was a scene in the book upon which a Native had killed a panther and he was trying to explain to Pa how he had shot it from sitting in a tree the night before. The Native and Pa had to do a lot of sign language and acting to convey the message to each other. Book (185) want the children to act out a message much in the same way. In order to be true have them write it on a card and turn it upside down on a table near them. Then they are to act out the message and see if the rest of the audience can get the message. Much like charades.
Next For the first part, Grandma wants the children to think of some ways they can trade off work with others around them, have contact with, or know. They are also to think of areas they have trouble learning and find others that can help them with that work. This will probably take some initiative from the children to talk to others the same as Pa did to trade work with Mr. Edwards and Mr. Scott. Many things like building a barn and having a barn building day were done the same way. Branding and haying are still done today much the same way. Somethings just take more than one person. The village my husband was from did much of this for the yearly festival in December, they share one tractor among them and help others in many ways. When we were there for a couple of days a woman had a heart attack and the village arranged for us to take her to the hospital. The people were all grateful and all participated to carry her to the car.
 
The next page is a Graph Activity/Curriculum Connections page called Have a Nice Day
(Grandma plans most of what she does in this same way or sets up schedules for herself even if they never turn out the same. It helps her regulate her goals.) Talk about the ways you and your children spend their days. Write down the amount of time spent at each task, lesson, activity, whatever, it is you do in the day. Knowing there are 24 hours in the day try to think how you spend each hour of that day doing; be sure to include sleep; cut it where is necessary and add where is necessary to make 24 hours a day. It helps organize your day in your head and where the next day will go. Next draw a large circle on the side of a box or poster and divide the circle into 24 pieces. Explain to the children how this is a what they call a Circle Graph and put the amount of time divided in the 24 pieces by the pieces as 1 hour each. Therefore, if one study is 2 hours long mark the area on the pieces(2) as that. Later you can cover it with pictures if you wish of each doings of time. Mark it "What a Day!"
Next with the Circle Chart do the same with Laura of Little House on the Prairie. Figure out what they spent their day doing and chart it on a separate Circle Graph. Talk about the differences then talk about how time might be for children in the future especially since they are integrating computer learning into classrooms and at home now.
 
Another section of the page talks about learning manners in the time of the pioneers. Learning may not have been as much fun as with the Ingalls. Many homes of those times and before times may have been pretty cruel that Grandma does not want to talk about and leave it in the past. However, do talk about the manners of napkins, sitting up straight, walking without slouching, using silverware (which some homes still had none of, licking the fingers, talking with the mouth full, contradicting, speaking unless you are spoken to, etiquette, speaking too loud or speaking out, etc. Talk about how they may have been taught and how they are taught today. Talk about the importance. Grandma had learned in her school work that some parents can be too strict and create some imbalances or mental blocks, but some children can have no direction and that is worse for them. That it is better to teach that there is consequences to every action, not necessarily discipline by parents but things that actually do happen; like having to pay for a window broken, which is better if it is not taught with the ill thoughts of mankind. I hope you agree. Happy homes make happy people that is for sure, just don't lack in any direction at all. Some of these learnings may be found out by talking to older people you know.
 
The last page in book (185) is a Summarizing/Curriculum Connections page of Extended Activities
 
One Day at a Time Summarize the story Little House on the Prairie in which the Ingalls family started with a wagon and before the end of the book Pa has built a house with a door, a fireplace, a wood floor, a bedstead, and a rocking chair. He built a stable and dug a well, and the family had planted a vegetable garden. Make a special time line to show this where all they have at the end is the wagon again.
 
"Social Studies: Where in the World? To identify the setting of Little House on the Prairie, help (the children) locate the places from the book on a map of the United States. Have students take turns finding Wisconsin, Iowa, Missouri, Kansas, and Oklahoma, then trace the Verdigris River through southeastern Kansas to where it flows into the Arkansas River near Muskogee in eastern Oklahoma.
 
Black American Pioneers The Black American West Museum in Denver, Colorado, documents the rich heritage of black men and women in the American pioneer movement, including law officers, stagecoach driver, miners, editors, farmers, and cowboys. A catalogue of books and materials is available from the Black American West Museum, 3091 California Street(if it has not changed) Denver, Colorado, 80205; telephone number (303) 292-2566(which probably has changed)."
 
Health: A Balanced Diet Make a chart of food the Ingalls family ate and compare it to a record of good food to eat. Book (185) says they ate Grains of cornbread(and they probably ate some oatmeal and grits as well as pancakes and musk, breads of different grains and fruits as berries found in the woods and in the prairie; Dairy-milk, cheeses as cottage cheese. butter from buttermilk; Meat-rabbit, prairie hen, beef(pretty rare, fish, chickens, and especially eggs as well as beans, maybe pork or bacon if lucky, duck more likely, lots of turkey, maybe buffalo or bear. probably some dear if lucky, and lamb if really lucky. Fresh vegetables were grown if they were lucky to get the seed. They could grow plenty of potatoes, peas, chickpeas and Garbanzo beans, beats, corn, spinach, okra, tomatoes, carrots all of which could be canned. Berries, watermelons, pumpkins, cantaloupe, and grapes could all be cooked and canned also. There was no place cold but a possible cellar, cool streams, or the winter to freeze things. Some people had smoke houses to salt and smoke meat to keep it. They had to use milk and such products fast so they did not spoil. The vitamins in things were probably better than today."
 
"Science: Take Your Medicine ...the real name of the sickness called "fever 'n ague" is malaria. ...the bitter medicine Laura has to take is called quinine. Invite (the children) to look up malaria in the encyclopedia to find out more about how it is caused and cured." Talk to the children about some of the medicine of those times compared to the medicines they take to day. Grandma has cleared her ear infections with peroxide, but her mother had bad earaches when young that her grandmother cured with hot oil and it worked. We used olive oil which has many cures in Grandma's ears and it cured them this year and it has not come back again. We have taken curry for the sinuses and it has helped. Turmeric is suppose to help arthritis but I have yet to try enough. Some home remedies were good and maybe some were not good enough. Who is to say. Grandma has yet to learn.
 
The Science experiments from Grandma's book (12) are about Evaporation and Vaporization. The first experiment is called Jet boat. Bore a hole from the inside through the screw top of an aluminum pill tube about four inches long, and pour some water into the tube.( They may not make these any more, check with the pharmacy.) Fix the tube in an empty sardine can into which you have fixed three candle stumps and place the can in water. If you light the candles the water soon boils, and the jet of steam escaping from the back drives the boat.
Steam is formed in the boat's boiler when the water boils. Because it expands sharply, it escapes at high pressure through the nozzle and causes a recoil. Do the experiment in calm weather!
 
The next experiment is called Hovercraft. Place a tin lid on a hot-plate and heat it well (take care!). If you then let a few drops of water fall on the lid, you will observe a small natural phenomenon. The drops are suspended in the air like hovercraft and whiz hissing to and fro for a while.
On contact with the heated metal the water drops begin to evaporate at once on the underside. Since the steam escapes with great pressure, it lifts the drops into the air. So much heat is removed from the drops by the formation of steam that they do not even boil.
 
The next experiment is called Rain in the room. Rain after sultry days makes the inside of the window pane suddenly sweat. You can distinguish the tiny water droplets through a magnifying glass. Where do they come from?
After it has been raining the air outside cools sharply because the water evaporates and thus uses heat. The warm air in the room, which is saturated with water vapor, especially from cooking, cools down only slowly on the window pane. But cold air cannot hold so much moisture as w
arm air, and therefore loses some of it on to the pane. It forms water droplets-exactly as when it is raining out-of-doors and moist, warm air meets cold air.
 
The next experiment is called Weather station. Fix a dry pine cone on to a small piece of wood with sealing wax or glue. Stick a pin into one of the central scales and place a straw over it. Put the cone out-of-doors, protected from the rain. The straw moves according to the state of the weather. Fix up a scale.
This simple hygrometer was built by nature. The pine cone closes when it is going to rain, to protect the seeds from damp. The outside of the scales absorbs the moisture in the air, swells up and bends--a process which you can also observe with a piece of paper which is wet on one side.
 
This next doings is called a Hygrometer. Coat a strip of writing paper two inches long with glue and roll it onto a sewing needle. Stick a strip of shiny photographic paper about 1/2 inch wide and one foot long onto its end so that its shiny surface faces the glue-covered side of the writing paper. The film strip is rolled round the needle like a clock spring. Punch a small hole through the middle of the bottom and lid of a furniture polish tin, and also air holes in the bottom. File off the metal projections formed. Push the needle through the central holes and stick the end of the film strip firmly to the side of the tin. Fix a paper pointer in front of the needle with a cork disk, and a bead behind it.
The gelatin layer of the photographic film expands-in contrast to the paper layer-with increased air humidity, causing it to wind up sharply, and move the pointer to the right. When the humidity of the air falls, the pointer returns to the left.
 
The next experiment is called Water from the desert. We still read in the newspapers of people dying of thirst in the desert, but many of them cold help themselves in this emergency. An experiment on a small scale in a sand box will show you how to do it. Dig a fairly deep hole and place a beaker in the middle. Spread a suitably sized piece of transparent plastic foil over the edge of the hole and lay a small stone in its center so that it dips down to the beaker in the shape of a funnel. The edges are fixed firmly into the sand. Soon, especially in sunshine, small drops of water form on the underside of the foil. They become larger and larger and finally flow into the beaker.
The effect of the sun is to heat the ground strongly under the foil. The moisture held in the sand evaporates until the enclosed air is so saturated that small drops of water are deposited on the cooler foil. Even desert sand contains some moisture. If you also place cut up cactus plants into the hole, you will obtain enough water to survive.(When Grandma was young we had a neighbor who had been a farmer show us how to take a V-shaped branch and holding it straight forward would bend down where water could be found to build a well. It was really neat.)
 
The next experiment is called Bath game with a coin. Stretch a strip of cellophane (not plastic foil), 1 inch wide, tightly over a soup plate and fasten the ends with adhesive tape. Lay on the middle of the strip an average-sized coin and pour water into the dish up to about 1/2 inch under the coin. The coin sinks slowly and reaches the water after several minutes.
The water vaporizes, the cellophane absorbs the water particles from the air and expands until it reaches the water. But strangely enough it soon begins to tighten again, and the coin rises again slowly to its original position.
The last experiment in this section is called Steam boat. Break off the head of a match and drop some glue on to the end. If you place the match in a dish of water it moves jerkily forward.
The glue contains a solvent which evaporates to give a vapor. It puffs out from the drop in invisible little clouds, giving the match a small push each time. Eventually so much of the solvent has escaped that the glue becomes solid. In a dried drop of glue you can still see the residual solvent vapor as small bubbles.
 
Many more picture of Mary Cassatt's to study and learn by at Grandma's Place of Natural Learning Center.Last for this day given will be the Calendar History for two days of May. May 22, 1783 William Sturgeon, English inventor who devised the electromagnet, was born. In 1813 Richard Wagner, German composer, was born. In 1844 Mary Cassatt, American painter, was born. Impressionist artist Mary Cassatt is best known for her paintings of family life. Show students reproductions of her artwork. Then ask them to design and color updates of these pictures, using today's fashions and their own family activities.
In 1859 Sir Arthur Conan Dayle, British author and creator of Sherlock Holmes, was born. Book (1) says,"Celebrate the birthday of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle by having (the children) conduct a week long search for traces of Doyle's most famous character--Sherlock Holmes--in books, newspapers, television programs, films, magazines, and so on. At the end of the week, the (children) can share their evidence of Holmes's pervasive influence in daily life.
In 1907 Sir Lawrence Olivier, English actor, was born. In 1933 Arnold Lobel, children's author and illustrator was born. Book (1) explains, "In honor of Arnold Lobel's birthday, read aloud a story about two of his well-known characters, Frog and Toad. Afterward, pass around the book so students can become familiar with these characters. Then encourage the children to generate questions about the lives of Frog and Toad. For example: What happened before the story began? What will happen after the story ends? Do Frog and Toad have brothers or sisters? Do they have other friends? After the children have developed a list, ask them each to select a question they'd like to answer. Then have them create stories that answer the questions. Encourage the students to role-play their stories or to write and illustrate them.
It is International Pickle Day on May 22.(There is nothing like experiencing a large pickle to eat.) Book (1) says, "On International Pickle Day, tell your (children) that the word pickle can be used as a noun or a verb. Together, come up with example sentences. Then challenge the kids to list other words that can be used as either nouns or verbs. It is also National Maritime Day on that day.
In 1570 The Flemish cartographer Abraham Ortelius published the First Modern Atlas. In 1819 The First Steamship crossing of the Atlantic was completed. In 1900 E.S. Votey obtained a patent for the First Pneumatic Piano Player. In 1906 Orville and Wilbur Wright received the First Airplane Patent. In 1972 President Richard Nixon became the First U.S. President to Visit Moscow. In 1980 Joe Hernandez did 135 Consecutive Chin-Ups with no breaks in Cashion, Ariz.
We will start on another Day as soon as Grandma sweeps the floor and does some dishes.

6 Comments to Day 161:

Comments RSS
drury lane clinic on Wednesday, January 20, 2016 3:09 AM
Great job right here. I truly loved what you was required to state. Keep planning since you also certainly deliver a fresh voice for this subject. Not some people could state exactly what youve mentioned nonetheless allow it to be useful. Well, at least Internet marketing engaged. Cant hold out to see a lot more of this coming from people.
Reply to comment


mark on Friday, July 13, 2018 12:57 AM
I really like to read this fantastic post! I read your blog and I think it is very informative for all people.Thanks for your great info. Receipt Book
Reply to comment


assignment writing on Saturday, December 15, 2018 2:41 AM
Fantastic! It is an extremely astonishing and useful article for me. In this article, we find numerous things that are exceptionally extraordinary. In this, we talk about recreations and some social issues.keep it up
Reply to comment


CBD Tinctures on Saturday, March 30, 2019 7:03 AM
CBD and hemp oil online shopping. CBD and hemp oil products for sale online. Shop for CBD and hemp oil now!
Reply to comment


Alfred Mason on Friday, June 14, 2019 2:55 AM
You have provided good information. I would love to read more on such topics. Thank you very much for it and carry on it. Thank for sharing this informative blog with us. Thank you :) https://www.safesunmobile.com/blog/2016/09/09/Super-happy.aspx
Reply to comment


sims 4 cheats on Thursday, September 05, 2019 11:07 PM
I am always searching online for articles that can help me. There is obviously a lot to know about this. I get to you a new game. This is hot games in the year. Click link to visit site.
Reply to comment

Add a Comment

Your Name:
Email Address: (Required)
Website:
Comment:
Make your text bigger, bold, italic and more with HTML tags. We'll show you how.
Post Comment
Website Builder provided by  Vistaprint