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Home Educaton Program

Beginning of July's Summer Lessons

These activities are great if they can be utilized next summer because Grandma had so much trouble getting them to you. However, they can be infiltrated in Lessons now as part of lessons about Summer now and beginning activity to start the new year off.
July's big project for the month is all around the observation of July as Anti-Boredom Month. The children are to make lists with you for things that are in "three categories: fun for one, small-group fun, and large-group fun." Ok! So you ask how can I do that when it is only my children and me. There are things first that they know they like to do alone as some reading. There are things as a family or with a few friends you like to do. Then ways of developing friends and bigger groups is if you have lots of neighbor friends, a church that does a lot together, hospitals (especially for children), orphanages, child care homes or centers, old peoples homes or care places, libraries might be helpful, use your imagination, there used to be home school clubs that did some things together(it is an option). Form a favorite sport together. Help your children with this activity as much as possible. You are suppose to form it into a book. I know you can do it. Just try!

"The Monthlong Observances" from Book (1) besides Anti-Boredom Month for July are as follows:
"Blueberry Month
Hitchhiking Month
National Baked Bean Month
National Hot Dog Month
National Ice Cream Month
Picnic Month
Read an Almanac Month
Recreation and Parks Month

Weeklong Events" are as follows:
"Music for Life Week (first week)
Special Recreation Week (first full week)
Be Nice to New Jersey Week (second week)
Space Week (week including July 20)"

And "Special Days and Celebrations
Independence Day (July 4)
Bastille Day (July 14)
National Ice Cream Day (third Sunday)"
(Look into this one with September's)


July 1 has three birthdays as follows:

July 1, 1872 Louis Bleriot, French aviator who became the
first person to fly an airplane across the English Channel, was born.

July 1, 1961 Diana Spencer, princess of Wales, was born this day.

July 1, 1961 Carl Lewis, American track star, was also born.

Events for July 1 are as follows:

July 1, 1847 The First Official U.S. Postage Stamps were issued.

Book (1) writes in "People on postage-When the first American postage stamps were issued, Benjamin Franklin appeared on the 5-cent stamp and George Washington appeared on the 10-cent stamp.  Why do the children think these people were chosen? If postage stamps were being issued or the first time today, what people or images would your (children) want on the stamps? Have them draw and color their own "first issue" stamps."

July 1, 1862 Congress established the Bureau of Internal Revenue.

July 1, 1863 The Civil War Battle of Gettysburg began.

July 1, 1867 The Dominion of Canada was created.

July 1, 1898 Theodore Roosevelt and His Rough Riders
charged up San Juan Hill during the Spanish American War.

July 1, 1941 The First Television Commercial, sponsored by
Bulova Watch, was broadcast in New York.

Book (1) talks about it in "TV selling-Tell your (children) that the first television ad, broadcast on station WNBT in New York, lasted 10 seconds and cost $9. Ask your (children) how much the sponsor paid per minute. At the time, there were 4,000 TV sets in the New York area. If one person was watching each TV set when the commercial aired, how much did the sponsor pay per viewer? Ask the kids to find out how many people watch their favorite program and how much a minute of commercial time on the program costs. Then have them compare these figures with those from the first commercial."

July 1, 1963 The Five-Digit Zip Code was introduced.

July 1, 1971 The Twenty-Sixth Amendment was ratified,
giving 18-year-olds the right to vote.

July 1, 1990 A treaty unifying the Monetary Systems of
East and West Germany became effective.

July 1 is also Canada Day and National Hot Dog Month is given an activity in Book (1) this day
called "Good doggies-Celebrate National Hot Dog Month with a healthy twist. Have (the children) examine labels to determine the fat content and nutritional value of various brands of hot dogs. Then ask the kids to chart their resuls. Afterward, have them create truth-in-advertising poster guides to healthy hot dog eating (which Grandma does not follow too well, but Grandpa doesn't like hot dogs too often). (You can display you poster wherever you wish, for they are good information and Grandma definitely is for eating good food for yourselves, but costs seem to hold us all back on what is good sometimes.)"


July 2 has four birthdays as follows with two activities:

July 2, 1908 Thurgood Marshall, American jurist who became the
first black Supreme Court justice, was born.

Book (1) says in "Early judicial experiences-Tell your (children) that as a boy, Thurgood Marshall frequently got into trouble at school. Ironically, his punishment was to memorize parts of the U.S. Constitution. Marshall once remarked that he'd learned the entire document by heart by the time he graduated. Ask your (children) to write down the career paths they hope to follow. Then have them speculate on which school experiences might influence their future professions."

July 2, 1919 Jean Craighead George, children's author, was born.

July 2, 1951 Jack Gantos, children's author, was born.

July 2, 1964 Jose Canseco, Cuban-born baseball player who
became the first major-leaguer to hit 40 home runs and steal
40 bases in one season.

Book (1) says "40 is fabulous-Have your (children) celebrate Canseco's "40s feat." For the rest of July, have them keep a journal describing 40 things they did or that happened to them during the month. At month's end, have them each list their 40 things in order of greatest significance. Post the lists on a (poster called "Top 40" to post on the wall somewhere.)"

Events for July 2 are as follows:

July 2, 1776 The Continental Congress approved the
Declaration of Independence.

July 2, 1881 President James Garfield was Shot by
Charles Guiteau, a disgruntled office seeker. The
president died of his wounds 80 days later.

July 2, 1932 Franklin Roosevelt accepted the Democratic Party's
nomination for president, pledging a "New Deal for the American People."

July 2, 1964 President Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964,
which guaranteed the enforcement of nondiscrimination in public accommodation,
government facilities, education, and employment.

July 2, 1976 The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the
Death Penalty was not cruel or unusual punishment.

July was also recognized as National Ice Cream month on July 2 saying in "Flavorful ice cream-During National Ice Cream Month, have your (children) conduct a ...survey..to find out ...(others) favorite ice cream flavors. Ask them to create a pie chart, table, or bar graph to display their findings. What are the three most popular flavors? Afterward, have the kids brainstorm for all the known flavors of ice cream. Then have them suggest some new and unusual ones--For example, jalapeno pepper, mustard and relish, or anchovy pizza. Have them write descriptive sentences telling what these flavors would taste like. Bring in a gallon of vanilla ice cream and a variety of the (children's) suggested flavorings, then let the kids create. How do their new flavors taste?" 

July 3 only has two birthdays:

July 3, 1878 George M Cohan, American playwright and composer, was born.

July 3, 1962 Tom Cruise, American actor, was born.

The events are almost just as sparing:

July 3, 1608 French explorer Samuel De Champlain founded Quebec.

July 3, 1775 George Washington took command of the
Continental Army in Cambridge, Mass.

July 3, 1863 The Battle Gettysburg ended.

Book (1) explains in "Hallowed ground-The Battle of Gettysburg proved to be one of the most decisive battles of the Civil War as well as a defining moment in the history of the nation. After e days of fighting, during which both sides suffered terrible casualties, the Confederate forces were compelled to retreat, with any realistic hope of winning the war dashed. Have your (children) read about the battle, then imagine themselves as one of the participants, whether a famous commander or a common soldier, Ask the kids to write a letter from participant to family members describing the events at Gettysburg."

July 3, 1890 Idaho became the 43rd state.

July 3, 1991 Mount Rushmore was finally officially
dedicated on its 50th anniversary. Ceremonies in 1
941 had been canceled because of World War II.

July 3 is also noted as Complement Your Mirror Day as Book (1) uses "Mirror, mirror, on the wall-Place a mirror in a corner of your (learning area accessible to the children.) Put several strips of blank paper around the mirror, then encourage the kids to write general compliments on the strips--for example, "What a great smile!" or "You look marvelous! The comments are sure to bring smiles whenever the kids look in the mirror."

July 3 is also used for Stay Out of the Sun Day which Book (1) talks about it in "Harmful rays-Ask your (children) to investigate how the sun's rays affect exposed skin. Then have the kids draw posters and create advertisements ... warning others about the dangers of too much sun. Next, invite the children to design protective hats for people to wear outdoors. You could even challenge them to design hats for animals that spend a lot of time in the sun. For example, what type of hat would an elephant wear to protect those big, floppy ears?"


July 4 in Book (1) comes out with three good activities and lots of birthdays as well as events:
The birthdays are as follows with two good activities:

July 4, 1804 Nathaniel Hawthorne, American novelist, was born.

July 4, 1826 Stephen Foster, American composer, was born.

July 4, 1872 Calvin Coolidge, 30th president of the United States, was born.

July 4, 1900 Louis Armstrong, American jazz musician, was born.

Book (1) also points out and gives an activity in "Celebrating "Satchmo-To celebrate Louis Armstrong's birthday, play "It's a Wonderful World" for your (children). Then, with the music playing in the background, have (the children) tape their impressions of why the world is wonderful or how people can work to make it better."

July 4, 1918 Ann Landers and Abigail Van Buren, twin sisters who each wrote a popular newspaper advice column, were born.

Book (1) tells about them in "Advice for kids- Observe the birthdays of advice columnists Abigail Van Buren and Ann Landers by asking each (child) to write a short letter asking for advice about a typical kid problem. Collect the letters, mix them up, with letters from others or your child and you answer them by searching for the answers. ( Grandma wants to start a column as this herself, maybe you would like to start one in your family newspaper.)"

The events are as follows for July 4:

July 4, 1776 The Continental Congress adopted the
Declaration of Independence.

July 4, 1776 The Continental Congress appointed
Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, and Thomas Jefferson
to Design a Seal for the United States.

July 4, 1826 John Adams and Thomas Jefferson--the second and third presidents, respectively--died

July 4, 1831 James Monroe, the fifth president , died.

July 4, 1831 The Song "America" was Introduced at a service at
Boston's Park Street Church.

July 4, 1960 The First 50-Star American Flag was raised at Fort McHenry, Md.

July 4, 1980 Pitcher Nolan Ryan recorded his 3,000th Career Strikeout.

July 4, 1986 The 100th Birthday of the Statue of Liberty was celebrated with the largest fireworks display in U.S. history.

July 4 being Independence Day has an activity of its own in Book (1) as follows:
"Independence posters-Have each of your (children) create an "Independence Day Special Event" poster that features at least five local or national events. The posters' titles should incorporate the theme of independence. Ask local business or community organizations to display the finished posters."


July 5 is booming in the following birthdays:

July 5, 1709 Etienne De Silhouette, French finance minister
who created shadow portraits as a hobby, was born.

July 5 1801 David G. Farragut, first admiral of the U.S. Navy, was born.

July 5, 1810 (P.T.)Phineas Taylor Barnum, American
showman and circus promoter, was born.

Book (1) explains it in "Barnum's gullible public-P.T. Barnum once remarked of American audiences: "There's a sucker born every minute." What do your (children) think Barnum meant? As a follow-up, ask them to listen to TV advertising claims. Do these claims promise benefits they don't back up to entice the public Barnum thought was so gullible? Have the kids complile any wild claims into a class notebook as evidence of the truth of Barnum's maxim."

July 5, 1853 Cecil Rhodes, British statesman and founder of the
Rhodes scholarship, was born.

July 5, 1857 Clara Zetkin, German women's rights advocate and
founder of International Women's Day, was born.

July 5, 1958 Bill Watterson, cartoonist and creator of
"Calvin and Hobbes", was born.

Book (1) writes about it in "Classroom cartoonists-To celebrate the birth of cartoonist Bill Watterson, introduce the children to his two main characters--Calvin and Calvin's stuffed tiger, Hobbes. Read a few "Calvin and Hobbes" comic strips to the children, then ask them if they have any toys or pets they "talk to. Give them a chance to share stories about their secret friends. Then pass out blank storyboards and have the children develop their own comic strips about themselves and these friends."

Next are July 5 events:

July 5, 1811 Venezuela proclaimed its independence from Spain.

July 5, 1865 William Booth founded the East London Revival
Society (Salvation Army).

July 5, 1865 The Secret Service was created by Congress.

July 5, 1892 A. Beard patented the Rotary Engine.

July 5, 1946 The Bikini, designer Louis Read's shocking
new bathing suit, was first modeled.

Book (1) explains in "Bold bathing suits-Invite students to
follow in bikini designer Reard's pen lines by drawing and
coloring their own 21st-century bathing suits."

July 5, 1984 The Statue of Liberty's Torch was removed for repairs.

July 5ths Be Nice to New Jersey Week is also brought out in Book (1) through "State studying-During Be Nice to New Jersey Week, encourage your (children) to read up on the Garden State. Then post a sheet titled "Neat things about New Jersey." Each day, invite students to write down something interesting or unusual they learned about the state."


July 6 is just as interesting beginning with some interesting birthday's:

July 6, 1747 John Paul Jones, Revolutionary War hero often
called "the Father of the U.S. Navy", was born.

July 6, 1866 Beatrix Potter, children's author, was born.

Book (1) talks about her in "Thinking and talking animals-All of the animals in Beatrix Potter's stories have anthropomorphic qualities. Have your (children) look up the word anthropomorphic in the dictionary
Then invite them to tell about times when their pets (or other animals) have appeared to act like humans. Afterward, have the children write and illustrate stories about animals imbued with human qualities."

July 6, 1907 Dorothy Clewes, children's author, was born.

Then we are given the events for July 6:

July 6, 1776 The Declaration of Independence was announced
on the front page of the Pennsylvania Gazette.

Book (1) writes in "A dangerous document?-After reading the Declaration of Independence, some people called it a dangerous document. Ask your (children) why people might have felt this way. Next, ask them to imagine that they were living in 1776. Would they have agreed with the sentiments expressed in the Declaration of Independence or remained loyal to the king? Have them write their reactions in their journals (and possibly share them later.)"

July 6, 1885 Louis Pasteur administered the first successful
antirabies inoculation to a boy who'd been bitten by a rabid dog.

July 6, 1919 A British dirigible became the First Airship to Cross the Atlantic.

July 6, 1933 Babe Ruth hit the First Home Run in an All-Star Game.

Book (1) writes in "Making baseball history-Even before he hit the first home run in an All-Star game, Babe Ruth had made baseball history. During the 1927 season, he hit a record 60 home runs. In 1929, his salary climbed to $80,000 a year--more than the president of the United States earned. When Ruth was criticized for making more than the president, he reportedly quipped, "Why not? After all, I had a better year than he did." Have your (children) discuss what this story tells about American society. Then have them debate this question: Does America reward its sports and entertainment stars with too much money and fame? Encourage the kids to use concrete examples to bolster their arguments."

July 6, 1945 Nicaragua became the First Country to Accept
the United Nations Charter.

July 6, 1954 Elvis Presley made his first record.

July 6, 1989 A study was released that found Dangerously High Cholesterol Levels in one-third of American adults.


July 7 gets very busy with events but it only has a few birthdays as follows:

July 7, 1887 Marc Chagall, Russian-French artist noted for
his dreamlike paintings, was born.

July 7, 1906 Satchel Paige, American baseball pitcher, was born.

July 7, 1940 Ringo Starr, English musician and
member of the Beatles, was born.

Now begin the events:

July 7, 1861 The First Torpedo Attack of the Civil War took place.

July 7, 1923 Warren Harding became the First U.S. President to Visit Alaska.

July 7, 1936 Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind was published.

July 7, 1958 President Dwight Eisenhower signed the Alaska Statehood Bill.

July 7, 1972 NASA announced Plans to Collect Solar Energy to be
used as a power source on earth.

Book (1) writes in "Solar Experiment-Tell your (children) that solar heaters typically consist of a black panel containing tubes through which water circulates. The sun heats the water as it moves through the tues, and the hot water provides heat for buildings or homes. Ask your (children) why the panels are black. (Black absorbs heat.) Then have them conduct this simple experiment. Take two empty, same-size tin cans and paint the outside of one can black. Fill both cans halfway with cold water, then place them outside in the sun. Take the temperature of the water in both cans every 15 minutes. Students will find that the water in the black can becomes warmer faster."

July 7, 1985 German tennis star Boris Becker, age 17, became t
he Youngest player to Win the Wimbledon Singles Championship.

July 7, 1986 Charles Stocks played 711 Holes of Golf in 24 hours.

Book (1) writes in "Par for the course-Have your (children) calculate the average number of holes Charles Stocks played per hour, then round that number to the nearest hundredth. Then ask them to figure this out: If a round of golf consists of 18 holes, how many rounds did he play per hour? How does this number compare with the average number of holes played per hour?"

July 7, 1988 Eleven-year-old Christopher Lee Marshall
began his Flight Across the Atlantic. He followed the
course of his hero, Charles Lindbergh.

July 7 is also the day of other happenings as Tanabat in Japan but Video Games Day in which Book (1) explains in "Video hits-Help your (children) practice concise writing by having them each write just one paragraph to explain their favorite video game. Invite them to share their work with (others)."
It is also Fiesta De San Fermin as Book (1) writes in "Spanish stampede-Each year in July, the city of Pamplona, Spain, honors its patron saint, San Fermin, with an 8-day festival.The highlight of the festival comes when adventurous men run through the cobbled streets to the bullring--pursued by a group of bulls. Have your (children) write a short, humorous poem about the running of the bulls."


July 8 has only three birthdays also as follows:

July 8, 1838 Count Ferdinand Von Zeppelin, German pioneer
in lighter-than-air vehicles and the first builder of dirigibles.

Book (1) writes in "Airships and ads-Tell your (children) that dirigibles are also known as airships, blimps, or zeppelins (in honor of Count von Zeppelin). These vehicles have been used for passenger travel, scientific exploration, and warfare. For example, during World War II, Germany used zeppelins in air raids against Great Britain. Do your (children) know what dirigibles are commonly used for today? (Blimps are often used for advertising.) Ask your (children) to imagine they could advertise their favorite book on a blimp. What would their slogans say? Have the kids write their slogans on construction-paper blimps, then hang the blimps from the ceiling of the (house)."

July 8, 1918 Irwin Hasen, American cartoonist who created the
Green Hornet and the Green Lantern, was born.

Book (1) writes in "Green Hornet spin-offs-To celebrate Irwin Hasen's birthday, invite your (children) to create a cartoon using a colorful insect of their choice as the main character. Students can create either comic strips or a single-box cartoon and use balloons for dialogue."

July 8, 1932 Russell Everett Erickson, children's author, was born.

July 8 has several events as follows:

July 8, 1497 Portuguese navigator Vasco da Gama set sail from
Lisbon. His journey established a Sea Route to India via the
southern tip of Africa.

July 8, 1629 King Phillip IV of Spain sent King Charles I of England a Gift of Five Camels and One Elephant.(Now Grandma would do some things with this one as write about the Elephant and other gifts kings might have given each other.)

July 8, 1776 The Liberty Bell Rang Out in Philadelphia to
announce the adoption of the Declaration of Independence.

July 8, 1776 The Declaration of Independence was Read
to the Public for the First Time at Philadelphia's Independence Square. 

July 8, 1835 The Liberty Bell Cracked while being tolled during the
funeral procession of Supreme Court Justice John Marshall.

July 8, 1911 Nan Jane Aspinwall became the First Woman to
Cross the United States on Horseback. She covered
4,500 miles in 301 days.

Book (1) writes in "A long time in the saddle-To mark the day Nan Jane Aspin wall completed her horseback crossing of the United States, give your (children) some Math problems based on this equine odyssey. If Aspinwall rode 4,500 miles in 301 days, how many miles per day did she average? At the same pace, how long would it have taken her to ride 5,000 miles? How far would she have gone if she had ridden for a full year?"

July 8, 1976 Gerald Ford, who had assumed the presidency upon
the resignation of Richard Nixon, announced his plans to seek reelection.


July 9th has only one birthday:

July 9, 1819 Elias Howe, American inventor of a
lockstitiching sewing machine, was born.

The events are as follows:

July 9, 1755 General Edward Braddock was Fatally Wounded
during an attack in the French and Indian War. His aide,
George Washington, escaped injury.

July 9, 1776 General George Washington summoned his troops
to New York for a Reading of the Declaration of Independence.

July 9, 1816 Argentina declared its independence from Spain.

Book (1) writes in "Where in the world?-Have your (children) find Argentina and Spain on a world map. Then ask: In which hemispheres--and on which continents--are these two countries located? What body of water separates them? What is the capital of each country? How far is it from capital to capital?"

July 9, 1850 President Zachary Taylor Died while in office.

July 9, 1872 The Donut Cutter was patented by J.F. Blondel.

July 9, 1877 America's First Telephone Company,
Bell Telephone Company, was founded.

July 9, 1893 Surgeon Daniel Hale Williams performed the
First Successful Surgical Closure of a Heart Wound.

July 9, 1979 Voyager 2 passed Jupiter, returning photographs and scientific data.

Book (1) writes in "Mother Earth's music-Tell your (children) that Voyager 2 is one of two U.S. space probes that were launched in 1977. (The other probe is Voyager 1.) Besides their scientific instruments, both probes were equipeed with special records called "Sounds of Earth"-- in case of discovery by another civilization. ...make a list of the kinds of sounds your (children) would include on such a record. What would these sounds tell others about the earth and its inhabitants? Are there any particular sounds your students would not want to include? Why?"

July being Picnic Month Book (1) set it up for this day to present the following activity called "Pretend picnic-One day this month, plan an imaginary picnic for the characters in a book your (children) have recently read. Encourage the kids to consider the characters' likely tastes in food, attire, and games. The children may also want to develop a "guest list" including compatible characters from other books. Assemble their ideas into a booklet."
(Grandma suggests planning at least one picnic as a family and doing as much adventuring of the outside as possible. Do as much research as you can of the area you pick.)


July 10 is another full day starting with the following birthdays:

July 10, 1834 James Abbot McNeil Whistler, American painter, was born.

July 10, 1875 Mary McLeod Bethune, American educator, was born.

July 10, 1882 Ima Hogg, American philanthropist, was born.

July 10, 1885 Mary O'hara, children's author, was born.

July 10, 1916 Martin Provensen, children's author and illustrator, was born.

July 10, 1926 Fred Gwynne, actor and children's author, was born.


Book (1) writes in "Playing with words-Besides writing and illustrating children's books, Fred Gwynne is an award-winning stage, film and television actor. (Your (children) may recall on of his TV roles--Herman in "The Munsters.") Gwynne's most popular children's books are those on wordplay. In The King Who Rained, he illustrates the humorous results of using the wrong homophone or homonym. Have students look up the meanings of homophone and homonym. Then ...collect as many homophones or homonyms as possible in a week. At week's end, have the (children) create a silly (illustrations) depicting the literal meaning of (sentences) that misuses (some of these) words. Post the illustrations on (a poster.)"

July 10, 1943 Arthur Ashe, American tennis player, was born.

Now for the events of July 10:

July 10, 1220 London Bridge was damaged by fire and fell down.

July 10, 1853 Vice President Millard Fillmore assumed the
presidency upon the death of Zachary Taylor.

July 10, 1890 Wyoming became the 44th state.

Book (1) says in "What's in Wyoming-Wyoming, the 44th state, may have been among the last states to join the Union, but it has experienced more than its share of firsts. For example, Wyoming is home to our nation's first national park, Yellowstone, and to the first national monument, Devils Tower, Have your (children) locate Wyoming on a map, then find its capital, Cheyenne. In what part of the state is this city located? Next, ask the kids to use compass directions to describe the location of Yellowstone Park and Devils Tower in relation to Cheyenne and in relation to each other."

July 10, 1913 Death Valley, Calif., reached a temperature
of 134º F in the Shade--the highest ever recorded in the United States. 

July 10, 1929 Congress made official the current Size of U.S. Paper Money.

July 10, 1962 Telstar 1, the first satellite to relay TV and
telephone signals, was launched.

July 10, 1973 The Bahamas gained its Independence from Britain.

July 10, 1991 Boris Yeltsin was Inaugurated as president of Russia.


Next is July 11

Birthdays:

July 11, 1767 John Quincy Adams, sixth president of the United States, was born.

July 11, 1838 John Wanamaker, American merchant, was born.

July 11, 1899 E.B White, American essayist and children's author, was born.

Book (1) says in "Creating characters-Tell your (children) that a dream inspired author E.B. White to create his famous mouse character, Stuart Little. Then ask each child to create an animal character to be born or adopted into the child's own family. Next, have the kids write stories involving the reaction of their new family member to home life. Feature the stories at a (family) read-aloud."

July 11, 1929 James Stevenson, children's author, was born.

Events:

July 11, 1798 The U.S. Marine Corps was created by an act of Congress.

July 11, 1804 Vice President AAron Burr Fatally Wounded
Alexander Hamilton, the former Treasury secretary, in a pistol duel.

July 11, 1892 The U.S. Patent Office decided that J.W. Swan,
not Thomas Edison, was the Inventor of The Electric-Light
Carbon for the incandescent lamp.

July 11, 1934 Franklin Roosevelt became the First
President to go through the Panama Canal.

July 11,1955 The New Air Force Academy was dedicated at
Lowry Air Force Base in Colorado.

July 11, 1975 Chinese archaeologists announced the discovery,
in Shensi Province, of a 2,000-year-old burial mound containing
6,000 Life-Size Clay Statues of Warriors.

July 11, 1977 Kitty O'Neil set a Women's Power Boat Speed Record--275 mph.

July 11, 1984 The U.S. Department of Transportation ruled
that Air Bags or Automatic Seat Belts would be mandatory
on all American-made cars by 1989.

July 11, 1985 Pitcher Nolan Ryan recorded his 4,000th Career Strikeout.

For National Cheer Up the Lonely Day, Book (1) writes under "Only the lonely-Involve your (children) in National Cheer Up the Lonely Day. First, ask them to name individuals or groups of people who may be lonely, such as senior citizens, widows, widowers, disabled people, and hospital patients. Next, have the children brainstorm for ways to cheer these people up. For example, the children might suggest giving flowers or cards to hospital patients, delivering meals to elderly shut-ins, or organizing a sing-along at a local senior citizen enter. (Form) into "Children's cheer Squad," and have each ...select a "mission" from the list of ideas. Enlist ...volunteers (if you can) to help. Your (children) will not only be involved in a worthy project, they'll also derive great pride in being part of a caring community."

Then under World Population Day Book (1) says under "Population study-On World Population Day, have your (children) look up the meaning of the word demography. Then have them conduct a brief demographic study of (children) in their grade level. How many boys and girls are there? What are their ages? What ethnic backgrounds do they represent? Graph the results."

(Grandma is going to have to stop here.She will type some more tomorrow.)










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