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Home Educaton Program

Some more July Summer Lessons

We will start with July 17th Calendar History with activities all from Book (1). First we have the birthdays:

July 17, 1859 Luis Munoz-Rivera, Puerto Rican patriot and poet, was born.

For now it is known as Munoz-Rivera Day in Puerto Rico.

July 17, 1932 Karla Kuskin, children's author, was born.

Book (1) says in "Word lover-Author Karla Kuskin once said that her love of words was so great that she couldn't even bear to discard fortune-cookie fortunes. Have your (children) write their own fortunes or words of wisdom on 6-in-long strips of adding-machine tape. Tape the strips together and post them in the hallway for others to read. Later, introduce your (children) to the works of Karla Kuskin by reading The Philharmonic Gets Dressed."

July 17, 1935 Donald Sutherland, Canadian actor, was born.

The Events will be now:

July 17, 1850 The Fist Photograph of a Star was taken.

July 17, 1897 The steamship Portland arrived in Washington with
the First Major Gold Shipment from the Klondike.

July 17, 1938 Pilot Douglas "Wrong Way" Corrigan left
New York for California. He eventually landed in Dublin, Ireland.

Book (1) writes in "Wrong-way day-When Douglas "Wrong Way" Corrigan landed in Dublin, Ireland, he got out of his plane and asked, "Isn't this Los Angeles?" Invite your (children) to have a "wrong-way day." For example, (children) might wear their shirts backward, or you might mix up the schedule. You might also include some "wrong ways" into social studies. Have students consider how U.S. history would be different if certain events came out the "wrong way." For instance, what if the South had won the Civil War or we would have lost the Revolution War against England? What if the Pilgrims had landed in California?"

July 17, 1954 The First Newport Jazz Festival was held in Newport, R.I.

July 17, 1975 U.S. Astronauts and Soviet Cosmonauts
Joined Hands after linking their Apollo and Soyuz spacecrafts.

July 17, 1987 The Dow Jones Industrial Average Closed
over 2,500 points for the first time in history.

Book (1) says in "Stock market speculators-On the anniversary of the Dow Jones 2,500-point milestone, begin this (nearly) hands-on stock market activity. ...give each (child) $500 in play money. Explain that for the next 2 weeks, (they) will be seeking "profit" by investing their "money" in stocks. You will be the broker. For their initial investments, (they) can buy $500 worth of shares in any stock or stocks listed on the New York Stock Exchange.Each morning, (look at ) the business pages of the newspaper so the (children) can check the previous day's closing prices. Give the (children) the opportunity at this time to sell and buy stocks at the closing prices. At the end of the 2 weeks, total the value of each (child's) stocks to determine who earns the title of Wall Street wizards."



Next is July 18th starting with the birthdays:

July 18, 1918 Nelson Mandela, South African civil rights
activist and longtime leader of the African National Congress, was born.

July 18, 1921 John Glenn, U.S. astronaut
who was the first American to orbit the earth.

Book (1) has this to say about it in "Firsts in space-Have (the children) conduct research to find out about other "Firsts" in space exploration--for example, the first rendezvous in space, space station, space walk, U.S. astronaut, black astronaut, woman astronaut, space shuttle(, etc.) Armed with their data, the (children) can each make a rocket-shaped time line depicting these important events."

July 18, 1954 Felicia Bond, children's author, was born.


Now for July 18th Events:

July 18, 1792  American naval hero John Paul Jones died.

July 18, 1874 Tennis was introduced to the United States.

July 18, 1925 The American Automobile Association
Declared Women Drivers to be as Competent as Men Drivers.

July 18, 1940 Franklin Roosevelt was Nominated
for an Unprecedented Third Term.

July 18, 1947 President Henry Truman Signed the Presidential Succession Act.

July 18, 1955 Disneyland opened in California.

Book 1 tells about it in "Disneyland adventures-(Have your family visited Disneyland? If you have and your children haven't share your experiences with them. If they have with you talk about your memories.) Encourage them to (look) at park maps and souvenirs to enhance their presentations. ...obtain brochures from local travel agents. Share these with (each other), then invite (them) to write about what they'd do if they could spend a day with their favorite Disney character."

July 18, 1971 Brazillian soccer star Pele ended his
career with the Brazillian National Soccer Team.

July 18, 1974 Bob Gibson became the First National
League Pitcher to Strike Out 3,000 Batters in a career.

July 18, 1980 India became The Sixth Nation to Put a Satellite into Orbit.

July is also Read an Almanac Month; therefore, Book (1) has this to say in "Reading the almanac-
Teach (the children) how to locate information in an almanac by using the general index. Have them each identify their favorite hobby, vacation spot, or other topic, then locate it in the almanac. To test their newfound skills, have the kids list and share five facts about their topic that they gleaned from the almanac."



Next is July 19th with the birthdays first:

July 19, 1814 Samuel Colt, American inventor of the Colt revolver, was born.

July 19, 1834 Edgar Degas, French Impressionist Painter, was born.
(Learn about Impressionist Painters here also.)

July 19, 1865 Charles Mayo, American surgeon, was born.

July 19, 1916 Eve Merriam, children's poet, was born.

Book (1) has this to say about it in "Provocative poetry-Read aloud selections from Eve Merriam's It Doesn't Always Have to Rhyme, Blackberry Ink, and The Inner City Mother Goose. Have the children select their favorite poems and pick up Merriam's beat either by drawing pictures to go with the poems or by writing poems to reflect their own neighborhood experiences."

July 19, 1922 George Stanley McGovern, American politician
who ran unsuccessfully for the presidency in 1972, was born.

Book (1) has the following to say about it in "Forgotten politicians?-To mark George McGovern's birthday, have your (children) compile a list of unsuccessful presidential and vice presidential candidates from the second half of the 20th century. Ask each child to research the postelection career of one of these candidates,, then write a one-paragraph summary on an index card. Post the cards on a (poster board or wall) titled"American Politicians: Where Are They Now?""


Next are the following events for July 19th:

July 19, 1812 The United States Declared War On England
over the issue of British interference with American
trade and shipping on the high seas.

July 19, 1848 The First Women's Rights Convention met
in the home of Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

July 19, 1969 John Fairfax arrived in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.,
after Rowing Across the Atlantic.

July 19, 1984 At its convention in San Francisco, the
Democratic Party nominated Geraldine Ferraro for vice
president. It was the first time a woman had been
chosen for a major-party ticket.

July 19, 1985 NASA chose teacher Christa McAuliffe
from among 11,000 applicants to be its first civilian
crew member on a space shuttle.

July 19 is also National Ice Cream Day (third Sunday in July) therefore Book (1) says in "Ice cream poll-To celebrate National Ice Cream Day, have each of your (children) ask at least 10 people the following question: "Does ice cream taste best served in a cone or in a dish?" Encourage (them) to create a pictograph to display the results. As a culminating activity, bring in ice cream, cones, and dishes--and invite your (children) to serve themselves."


Next is July 20th with only two Birthdays:

July 20, 1919 Sir Edmund Hillary, New Zealand explorer and
mountain climber who was the first to reach the summit
of Mt. Everest, was born.

July 20, 1947 Carlos Santana, Mexican rock musician, was born.

Now for July 20th Events:

July 20, 1810 Columbia declared its independence from Spain.

July 20, 1859 Baseball Fans Were Charged Admission (50¢)
for the first time, to see Brooklyn play New York.

Book (1) has an activity for this in "Batting for dollars-Ask your (children) to find out the cost of the cheapest ticket for a major-league baseball game at the park nearest their hometown. Then ask them to calculate the percentage increase in admission price since 1859."

July 20, 1881 Sitting Bull surrendered to federal troops at
Fort Buford in the Dakota Territory.

July 20, 1944 President Franklin Roosevelt was Nominated
for an Unprecedented Fourth Term at the Democratic convention.

July 20, 1964 NASA tested the First Successful Rocket engine.

July 20, 1969 Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz
Aldrin became the First Men to Set Foot on the Moon.

Book (1) writes in "Moon memories-Have your (children) ask their parents or grandparents to recall where they were and what they were doing when astronaut Neil Armstrong stepped onto the moon. Your (children) will themselves remember other historic happenings--including, perhaps, the smashing of the Berlin Wall, the liberation of Kuwait, and the Challenger accident. Have the children each make a chart that consists of historic events they recall and where they were, who they were with, and what they were doing the day each event occurred."

July 20, 1976 The U.S. space probe Viking 1 landed on Mars.

Book (1) says in "Searching for signs of life-After landing on Mars, Viking 1 sent back television pictures of the planet's surface. It also conducted experiments, one of which involved searching for life. The lander scooped up a soil sample, then added certain chemicals to trigger an organic reaction. None was observed. Perhaps Viking 1 wasn't able to recognize what Martian life looks like. or maybe the site was, indeed, devoid of life. Have your (children) discuss what it means to show signs of life. Make a list of places a spacecraft could land on Earth and what signs of life would be found there. Next, make a list of places on Earth that wouldn't show any signs of life--for example, inside a volcano. Take your (children) on an indoor field trip at (home) to search for signs of life. Be sure to include bacteria as a type of life."

July 20, 1985 A diving expedition off the coast of Florida located
the remains of the Spanish galleon Nuestra Senora de Atocha,
sunk in a hurricane in 1622. The expedition recovered $400 Million
in Gold, Silver, and Copper Treasure.

July 20, 1987 Wilma Mankiller became the First Woman
Elected Chief of the Cherokee Nation.

July 20 is also considered Moon Day.


Now we move on into July 21 with the following birthdays:

July 21, 1899 Ernest Hemingway, American novelist, was born.

July 21, 1920 Isaac Stern, Russian violinist, was born.

July 21, 1952 Robin Williams, American comedian and actor, was born.

Book (1) says in "Stand-up comedy-Have your (children) seen Robin Williams on TV or in movies? To celebrate his birthday, ask the kids to choose a favorite comedian. Why do they like him or her? Are there any potential comedians in your (family)? Let those who wish prepare a short comedy skit and perform it in front of the family. Nonperformers might like to join forces with the (family comics) and help write the skits."



Now we will add the events for July 21:

July 21, 1834 The Liberty Bell was Muffled to toll the
death of the Marquis de Lafayette.

July 21, 1861 At the Battle of Bull Run, the first
major encounter of the Civil War, Confederate General
Thomas J. Jackson gained the nickname "Stonewall."

Book (1) writes in "Stonewall and other nicknames-Tell your (children) that Confederate General Thomas J. Jackson earned the nickname "Stonewall" during the first Battle of Bull Run. Despite overwhelming odds, his brigade stood firm--"like a stone wall"--against attacks from Northern troops. Ask your (children) to name other prominent Americans and the actions that have earned them recognition--for example, Alexander Graham Bell, Martin Luther King, Jr. , Sally Ride, Carl Lewis. What nicknames might your students give these people?"

July 21, 1873 Jesse James committed the World's
First Train Robbery, near Council Bluffs, Iowa.

July 21, 1925 Tennessee biology teacher John Scopes was found
Guilty of Teaching the Theory of Evolution, which was against
state law. He was fined $100.

July 21, 1930 The U.S. Veterans Administration was established.

July 21, 1959 The United States launched the Savannah,
the First Nuclear-powered Merchant Ship.

July 21, 1961 U.S. astronaut Virgil Grissom became the
Second American in Space. His flight lasted 16 minutes.

Book (1) says in "Flying in space-To mark the anniversary of Virgil "Gus" Grissom's space flight, turn off the lights in your (home) for 16 minutes. During that time--the length of Grissom's flight--ask your (children) to imagine what they might see or do or think about if they were flying in space. When the lights come back on, have the kids quickly write all their thoughts on scrap paper. Finally, have them use their ideas to write poems about space flight. (Make articles in your family newspapers also.)"

July 21, 1969 Astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin
Returned From the Moon to the command module,
manned by Michael Collins.

July 21 is also National Independence Day in Belgium.




Now we will start on July 22 with the following birthdays:

July 22, 1822 Johann Gregor Mendel, Austrian monk who
discovered the principles of heredity, was born. 

July 22, 1844 William Archibald Spooner, English clergyman
after whom the spoonerism was named, was born.

Book (1) explains in "Sunny flips of the tongue-Have your (children) look up "Spoonerism" in the dictionary. Next, (...challenge competition with your children by taking turns reading aloud a favorite poem. Afterward,...write down your poems, intentionally transpose the initial sounds of some words, Then ...read the spoonerism-filled results.)"

July 22, 1849 Emma Lazarus, American poet who wrote
the sonnet "The New Colossus," which is engraved on
the Statue of Liberty, was born.

July 22, 1881 Margery Williams Bianco, children's author
who wrote The Velveteen Rabbit, was born.

July 22, 1898 Alexander Calder, American artist
considered the originator of the mobile, was born.

Book (1) has the following to say in "Nature mobiles-Share some photographs of Alexander Calder's mobiles with your (children). Then encourage the children to make nature mobiles, " using leaves, twigs, tree bark, and other natural objects. First, take the students for an outdoor walk to gather their objects. Next, ask them to tie or glue their objects pieces of string cut to varied lengths, then tie the strings to coat hangers. Suspend the mobiles from the (home") ceiling."

July 22, 1898 Steven Vincent Benet,  American poet, was born.


Now we well cover the events for July 22:

July 22, 1587 More than 100 English colonists founded a
Second Colony on Roanoke Island off North Carolina, the
site of the first attempted English colony in America.
When supply ships returned 3 years later, the only
trace of the colony was the word Croaton carved on a tree.

July 22, 1796 Moses Cleaveland, a surveyor for the
Connecticut Land Co., founded Cleveland, Ohio.

Book (1) writes "Place names-Tell your (children) that in 1831, the spelling of Cleaveland was changed to Cleveland to better fit into a newspaper headline. What cities, buildings, businesses, schools, or streets in your (children's) area are named after people? Make a class list, and note any changed spellings."

July 22, 1881 In Seattle, Wash., Tom Clancy was Arrested
for Speeding on His Horse. He was riding more than
the legal limit of 6 mph.

July 22, 1933 American pilot Wiley Post completed the
First Solo Air Circumnavigation of the Globe. His flight
took 7 days, 18 hours, and 45 minutes.

July 22, 1975 Congress voted to Restore the American
Citizenship of Robert E. Lee, who had commanded the
Confederate forces during the Civil War.



Now we move onto July 23 starting with the two birthdays as follows:

July 23, 1926 Patricia Coombs, children's author, was born.

July 23, 1929 Robert Quackenbush, children's author, was born.

Not so many events as follows either:

July 23, 1827 America's First Swimming School opened in Boston.

July 23, 1829 William Burt received a patent for his
typographer,a Forerunner of the Typewriter.

July 23, 1903 Ford Motor Co. sold its first car.

Book (1) writes in "Classroom assembly line-Henry Ford, founder of the Ford Motor co., believed that the average person should be able to own a car. To make this possible, he developed one of the first assembly-line production systems. The assembly line allowed Ford to produce a greater number of cars at a lower price. The process proved so successful that other manufacturers began using it. Have your (children) conduct an experiment to test the effectiveness of an assembly line. Bring in a couple loaves of bread, several jars of Peanut butter and jelly, paper plates, and (a number of) knives. (Use the whole family to form an assembly line.) Tell the (family) that their goal is to make 12 peanut butter and jelly sandwiches as quickly as possible. (Divide up the work and put the jobs to work. Test yourselves with a timer. Than each of you make so many of the same sandwiches do some alone. Does it make it any faster?)"

July 23, 1958 Queen Elizabeth II named four women to the
peerage, making them the First Women members of the House of Lords.

July 23, 1962 Australia's Dawn Fraser became the First
Woman to Swim 100 Meters in Under 1 minute.

July 23, 1986 Britain's Prince Andrew married Sarah Ferguson.
They were titled the duke and duchess of York.

July 23 is also the time for Perseid Meteor Shower (Through mid-August). This is explained in Book (1) under "Seeking shooting stars-Tell your (children) that a meteor (also called a shooting star) is a streak of light in the sky that occurs when a meteoroid--a usually small, solid object from space--enters the earth's atmosphere and burns up. On a dark, moonless night, a careful observer might expect to see five or six meteors per hour. But at certain times of the year, when the orbit of a group of meteoroids intersects the earth's orbit, many more meteors are visible. This is called a meteor shower. Show your (children) a sky chart, pointing out the constellation Perseus and noting how to find it in the nighttime sky. Then encourage your (children) to observe the Perseid meteor shower, which begins about now but peaks around August 12. Tell them to go to a place away from bright lights, find Perseus, and note how many meteors they see in a 15- or 20-minute period."


Next is July 24 starting with the birthdays:

July 24, 1783 Simon Bolivar, South American patriot, was born.

Book (1) explains in "El Libertador-Simon Bolivar was born in Venezuela. As a child, he learned about the French and American revolutions and dreamed of the day his country would achieve independence from Spain. Bolivar became one of South America's greatest generals in the fight against Spain, managing to win independence for Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela. Have your (children) locate South America on a world map. Then have them find the countries that were liberated by Bolivar." (This lessons should be infiltrated in the North American revolution history but tied to studies for South America in the Spring, that is why it is good in the summer as well.)

July 24, 1802 Alexandre Dumas, French novelist, was born.

July 24, 1898 Amelia Earhart, American aviator, was born.

July 24, Bella Abzug, American politician and feminist, was born.

Book (1) tells about her in "Women's rights-Tell your (children) that when Bella Abzug was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1970, she pushed vigorously for women's rights. Ask the children to list the kinds of rights women have been fighting for since the 19th century, when women such as Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony were leading the charge. How has the women's movement progressed? Who are today's prominent feminists?"(A little note of Grandma's opinion here. Grandma is very partial to the dignity of women and the direction they have been led into. Grandma believes women should have all the rights a man has; however, Grandma feels this bit where feminists or business officials, educators, or group of people that feel they know it all and everyone should live a certain way or be a certain way that are controling our world may not be doing the best by us. Grandma feels women should be proud they are women and live up to standards to be as strong as we can being exactly like men or being with many womanly traits God has given us.
Grandma does not feel we have to dress in pants when a dress or skirt was designed to handle our bladder needs better than the design of a man being able to open his pants or slip them down to go in an easier position.
Many men the same as women like the feel and look of satins, ruffles, and sheers. A man is attracted to a women for his neat appearance in more of a rustic dress because they usually like to be doing things outside and rough. Not to say that women at times like to get just as close to the Earth and doing things they can. However, each person must work out a balance with the people they live with and things they like to do. However, to say the only way is to wear jeans or pants and act like a man is the only answer because men really like to be in control and if a women overpasses them they have a tendency to sit back and not want to do anything because they feel she can handle it why not let her and a lot ends up falling on the women that way. I feel fathers and mothers that do not give their girls a chance to be as lovely as the other girls try to rob them of the benefit of being a woman, not to say they want to be loved for how sexy or even sensual they are, but it can be a lot easier on them if they are allowed to have the time with their children if they want to and take care of womanly chores if they want to as well as put make-up on, fix their hair the way they want, or look a little more appealing even though many feel jeans can be sexy. They really can be too tight, or constantly have to be pulled up, or downright sloppy. Dress pants are ok, but when some older women can have so many problems that they have to change a pair of pants to fit in with the crowd, Grandma does not feel comfortable with the crowd bit nor will she ever.
Not all women are born with the strength to handle all the jobs men do as well as some women and I do not feel it should be forced on them. Some men do not want to do all the jobs women have done or like to do. Some men like to see women dressed up sensually occasionally and women like to see men dressed up themselves too. I feel there should be a fair balance made and other women nor men should put one or the other down because they look nice for each other at times. It makes a better relationship in the end. If women don't like dressing up nor men and want to look junky who is to put them down, but business people do frown on a too junky or sexy of a look someone might have, but some of those people hung around others that felt it was all ok.
Grandma got tired of looking junky in a T-shirt and old ragged pants or jeans for work. She learned where she felt comfortable. However, if I am doing something that could ruin my clothes as home or work I definitely wanted old ragged clothes on. If  it is summer and she knows she is going to be hot she wants shorts or something cool on.
Grandma just had to put her 3 cents in. Grandma does not always go to a beautician for her hair or whatever because she has only had a small budget to live on. As I said people should dress the way they feel comfortable at the time, but not have to live a certain form of dress to be considered for a man's job. I do feel they should be considerate of their spouses feelings in the way they dress and understand that if they want to sell a product to the public, the public is not going to change for their feelings, they have to dress presentable in order to be accepted by other people. That does not mean they have to show off with the most expensive or newest fad on the market at the time either. People will always look at the appearance of a stranger selling something unless they are the type that don't care any better than than the person selling. Smaller towns are worse than the bigger cities because of the variety of people to pick from. If many of you disagree maybe our world has us all mental blocked or some women are just trying to hide their own sex problems.)

Now lets do the events for July 24 as follows:

July 24, 1679 New Hampshire became a royal colony of the British crown.

July 24, 1701 Antoine De La Mothe Cadillac founded a fort at the site of Detroit.

July 24, 1847 Brigham Young and his Mormon
followers arrived at the Great Salt Lake in Utah.

July 24, 1866 Tennessee became the First Confederate
state to be readmitted to the Union.

July 24, 1959 U.S. vice president Richard Nixon and Soviet premier
Nikita Khrushchev Debated the Pros and Cons of Capitalism
and Communism on world television.


(Grandma feels this topic should be talked about because,
Soviet Unions idea of Communism was the incomes to be equal but far lower than the officials themselves therefore it left them in more power to decide who belonged there and what they should do.)

July 24, 1977 Dutch rider Henk Vink set a Motorcycle World Record
by covering a 1-kilometer course in 16.68 seconds from a standing start.

July 24 is also Pioneer Day in Utah therefore have some fun with it and it is also National Baked Bean Month in July. Book (1) says in "Best baked beans-Celebrate National Baked Bean Month by having your (friends and/or family) conduct a taste test of various (recipes and/or) brands of canned baked beans. Which brand tastes best? Which tastes worst? Afterward, challenge (the children) to create tongue twisters beginning with: "The best baked beans..."



Now we move onto July 25th beginning with the following birthdays:

July 25, 1750 Henry Knox, American military officer who served
as the first U.S. secretary of war, was born.

July 25, 1911 Ruth Krauss, children's author, was born.

July 25, 1954 Walter Payton, football star who set the NFL
career record for rushing, was born.

July 25, 1978 Louise Brown, the first socalled test-tube baby
(baby conceived through in vitro fertilization, was born.


Next are the events for July 25th:

July 25, 1814 The English inventor George Stephenson
first demonstrated a Steam Locomotive.

July 25, 1866 Ulysses S. Grant became the army's First Five-Star General.

July 25,  1909 The French engineer and aviator Louis Bleriot
made the First Airplane Flight Across the English Channel,
from Calais, France, to Dover, England.

Book (1) writes this in "Flying across the Channel-Tell your (children) that it took Louis Bleriot 37 minutes to complete his 20-mile flight. Help them appreciate Bleriot's aviation milestone by having them re-create it with paper airplanes. Have (the children) work ...to create a scale drawing of England. France, and the English Channel (somewhere else). They can use chalk or masking tape to lay out their design, (making France a good distance away from the drawing of England-maybe a foot 100-200 miles or as far as 500 miles to France.) Have the children mark the sites of Calais, France, and Dover England. Next have them each make a paper airplane. Students can then take turns flying their airplanes "across the Channel.""

July 25, 1934 Franklin Roosevelt became the First President to Visit Hawaii.

July 25, 1952 Puerto Rico's Constitution was proclaimed,
and the island became a self-governing commonwealth of the United States.

July 25, 1971 South African surgeon Dr. Christiaan Barnard Successfully
Transplanted Two Lungs and a Heart into a patient.

July 25, 1984 Soviet cosmonaut Svetlana Savitskaya became
the First Woman to Walk in Space.


July is also Recreation and Parks Month and July 25 of Book (1) says in "Passport to the parks-
The National Park Service offers a national parks passport book. Each time a passport holder visits a national park, the book gets stamped. Make a notebook-size version of this passport book for your students. List each national park or monument your students have visited on a separate page, and ask the kids to find an appropriate illustration or magazine photo. Then have students sign their names under the locations they've visited. Encourage those who will visit national parks or monuments in the future to send postcards for inclusion in the passport book. (Grandma will have some information for this later and she want to cover some of the National Parks in November to go along with the letter N for children.)



Now we will move onto July 26th starting with the birthdays:

July 26, 1856 George Bernard Shaw, British playwright, was born.

Book (1) writes under "Perspectives on teaching-Playwright George Bernard Shaw once observed, "Those who can, do. Those who can't, teach. " Share Shaw's quote with your (children). Then share this quote from Christa McAuliffe: "I touch the future; I teach." Ask your (children) which quote they think more accurately describes today's teachers. After they've shared their views, explain quotes to survey family, friends, and community members about their perceptions of teaching."

July 26, 1892 Pearl Buck, American author, was born.

July 26, 1897 Paul Gallico, American author of The Snow Goose, was born.

July 26, 1923 Jan Berenstain, children's author, was born.

July 26, 1943 Mick Jagger, British rock star, was born.

Book (1) writes in "Classroom rock fest-In honor of Mick Jagger's birthday, have a parent-(child) rock fest in your (home). ...find favorite Rolling Stones recordings. (Children and yourself) also can ( find your own favorite artists.) After playing a sampling of the songs, ask ...what they think of the other generation's musical tastes."

Now we will move into the Events:

July 26, 1788 New York became the 11th state.

July 26, 1847 The West African nation of Liberia proclaimed its independence.

July 26, 1889 China's Hwang Ho (Yellow River) flooded, leaving the
surrounding countryside under as much as 12 feet of water.

July 26, 1908 The Federal Bureau of Investigation was created.

July 26, 1920 Oscar Swann, age 72, won a medal in rifle
shooting, thus becoming the Oldest Olympic Medalist.

July 26, 1969 U.S. scientists examined the First Moon Rock Samples.

July 26, 1986 Bicyclist Greg Lemond became the First American
to Win the Tour De France. His time for the 2,500-mile race was
110 hours, 35 minutes, 19 seconds.

(Do some math figuring with this as: How many miles an hour figuring approximately 110 hours into the 2,500 miles equals what?)

July 26 is also Hopi Niman Dance in United States as Book (1) explains it in "Native American legends-Share with your (children) the Hopi Indian legend of the kachinas--supernatural beings who leave their mountain homes for half the year to visit the tribe. The kachinas are believed to bring good health to the people and rainfall for the crops. For the Niman dance, dancers portraying kachinas sing and dance for almost the entire day. Ask your (children) to name other supernatural beings--for example, leprechauns and guardian angels--who some to earth and help people. Then have the children write stories featuring supernatural do-gooders of their own invention."



The next day is July 27th with only two birthdays as follows:

July 27, 1913 Scott Corbett, children's author, was born.

Book (1) says in"Titles of honor-Children's author Scott Corbett fulfilled a longtime wish when he joined two friends for a balloon trip. They traveled from northern Rhode Island to southern Massachusetts. Later, Corbett joked that he could sign his name "Scott Corbett, I.A. (Interstate Aerialist)." Ask your (children) what titles they could give themselves based on their accomplishments. Next, have them fold 8 1/2 x 11-inch sheets of construction paper in half to make "nameplates" for their desks. Have them each write their name and new title on their nameplate."

July 27, 1948 Peggy Fleming, American figure-skating champion, was born.

Now we have the Events for July 27th:

July 27, 1586 Sir Walter Raleigh returned to England bearing
the Virginia colony's first tobacco crop.

July 27, 1775 Benjamin Church was named Surgeon General
of the Continental Army.

July 27, 1789 Congress established the Department of Foreign Affairs,
which later became the State Department.

July 27, 1866 The Fist Underwater Telegraph Cable Between
North America and Europe was completed.

July 27, 1909 Orville Wright set a World Record by staying
aloft in an airplane for 72 minutes and 40 seconds.

Book (1) writes in "It takes teamwork-Tell your (children) that Orville Wright worked together with his brother, Wilbur, to build and fly the first power-driven airplane. Since the Wright brothers worked as a team, how did they decide who would fly the plane on this day in 1909? Ask your (children) to speculate. How do your students think Orville felt during his record-setting flight? How do they suppose Wilbur felt watching from the ground? Have each (child) write a narrative from the perspective of either Orville or Wilbur."

July 27, 1921 Insulin was isolated for the first time.

July 27, 1931 A Swam of Grasshoppers descended on the
states of Iowa, Nebraska, and South Dakota, destroying
thousands of acres of crops.

July 27, 1953 The Korean War ended.

July 27, 1974 The House Judiciary Committee passed its
First Article of Impeachment Against President Richard Nixon.

July 27 is also Take Your Houseplants for a Walk Day and Book (1) has this to say in "Walk the plant?-Today is Take Your Houseplants for a Walk Day. Ask your (children) to suggest a scientific reason why this might be a good thing to do. (Plants remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and generate oxygen.) What whimsical reasons can they suggest?"

(By the way Book (1) has a picture with this insert where the children are walking and the plants are actually walking beside them as humans-a good laugh for the day.)



Next is July 28 with only two following birthdays:

July 28, 1932 Natalie Babbitt, children's author, was born.

Book (1) says in "Character diary-Natalie Babbitt's popular book Tuck Everlasting deals with the theme of searching for oneself. Read it aloud to the (children). As (the children) listen, have them keep a diary of their reactions to Winnie, the main character. Following the story's conclusion, have (the children) make collages to illustrate their reactions. They might include pictures, drawings, words, or other creative ways to capture the essence of a character who faces difficult choices."

July 28, 1943 Bill Bradley, professional basketball player
and U.S. senator, was born.

Book (1) writes in "Looking at Legislators-Before entering politics, Senator Bill Bradley of New Jersey was a basketball star. He earned All-American honors at Princeton University, played on the 1964 U.S. Olympic team, and won two NBA championships with the New York Knicks during a 10-year pro career. Bradley said that his basketball experiences taught him lessons he could apply in his work as a legislator. In particular, he believed, he gained insights into race relations, an issue he frequently spoke on. Ask your (children) to list professions or personal experiences that they believe would prepare a person for a successful career in Congress. Do the kids feel Congress should contain members from diverse backgrounds? Why? Have your (children) write to your state's two U.S. senators, asking each about his or her previous professional experiences."

Now we will cover the events for July 28th:

July 28, 1821 General Jose de San Martin proclaimed
Peru's Independence from Spain.

July 28, 1868 The Fourteenth Amendment defining U.S. citizenship and guaranteeing due process of law, took effect.

July 28, 1914 World War I began when Austria declared war on Serbia.

July 28, 1945 The U. S. Senate ratified the United Nations Charter
by a vote of 90-2.

July 28, 1945 A B-25 Bomber Crashed into the 79th floor of the
Empire State Building.

July 28, 1959 Daniel Inouye of Hawaii became the First
Japanese-American elected to Congress.

July 28, 1973 Six hundred thousand people attended the
Biggest U.S. Rock Concert ever, at Watkins Glenn, N.Y.

Book (1) writes about it in "Concert calculations-Tell Your (children) that 4 years before the Watkins Glen concert, in the summer of 1969, 400,000 people attended another famous rock festival held in New York State. Ask your students to name this event (Woodstock). There were 200,000 more people at the Watkins Glen event than at Woodstock. Have students calculate this difference as a percentage increase."

Lastly:

July 28, 1984 The Summer Olympics Opened in Los Angeles.
Nineteen nations, including the USSR, boycotted.



Moving on into July 29th with Three birthdays:

July 29, 1869 Booth Tarkington, American novelist, was born.

July 29, 1905 Dag Hammarskjold, Swedish diplomat and
second secretary-general of the United Nations, was born.

July 29, 1938, Peter Jennings, Canadian-born TV journalist, was born.

Now we will list the Events and activities for July 29 as follows:

July 29, 1778 A French Fleet Arrived at Rhode Island to help the
American colonists in the Revolutionary War.

July 29, 1958 Congress authorized the National Aeronautics
and Space Administration (NASA).

Book (1) writes here in "What's next for NASA?-As early as 1915, the U.S. government supported organized research on aeronautics. That year, a congressional resolution established the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). By 1958, government officials agreed that NACA's work should be extended to include the region outside earth's atmosphere--and NASA was created. Ask your (children)  to predict how NASA's work will be extended 10 years from now. For example, what other regions or heavenly bodies might be explored? Have each (child) write a science fiction story describing what might happen."
(By the way while Grandma was in Mexico during August we sighted lights in the sky that were not stars or anything normal. They looked like airplane lights but they were not moving like an airplane. They were just there and then disappeared. First it showed in one place then it disappeared and shown in another space and then did the same two or three other places. They said it happens there occasionally. Grandma had never seen anything like it before. It was really strange.)

July 29, 1962 Seventy-five American historians and political scientists Rated U.S. Presidents as "great," "near great," "average," below average," or "failure."

Book (1) writes about it in "Evaluating the presidents-Have your (children) rate all the presidents who've served in their lifetimes using the same scale as the historians and political scientists used in 1962. Ask the kids to cite specific events and presidential decisions to support their ratings."

July 29, 1981 Prince Charles and Lady Diana Spencer were
married in St. Paul's Cathedral in London.

July 29, 1988 Javier Sotomayor of Cuba became the First
High Jumper to Clear 8 feet.


July 29th is also Chincoteague Pony Penning(last Thursday in July) and Book (1) writes about it in "Where the wold horses are-Tell your (children) that about 150 wild ponies live on Assateague Island in Virginia. These animals are descendants of colonial-era horses. Each year, the ponies are rounded up and made to swim across the inlet to Chincoteague Island, where about 40 of them are sold. Ask (your children) to locate these two islands on a map of Virginia. How far apart are they? invite the kids to speculate on why the ponies are rounded up annually. (With no predators, they would eventually become too numerous for the island's ecosystem to sustain.) (This is a good lesson in Biology for the children.)



Now we will begin July 30 starting with only two birthdays:

July 30, 1863 Henry Ford, American automobile manufacturer, was born.

Book (1) writes in "The family car-In honor of Henry Ford's birthday, ask your (children) to collect data about their families' cars, including how many cars their families own, the makes and models, the colors, and the safety features, such as air bags or antilock brakes. Have (the children) work...to compile their data and design graphs illustrating the results.

July 30, 1947 Arnold Schwarzenegger, Austrian-born
bodybuilder and actor, was born.

Next are the following events for July 30th:

July 30, 1619 The First Representative Assembly in the American Colonies
met at Jamestown, Va., and enacted laws against drunkenness,
idleness, and gambling.

July 30, 1729 Baltimore Town (later Baltimore) was founded by the
Maryland colonial government.

July 30,1909 The United States Bought its First Airplane for $31,250.

July 30, 1919 Missouri farmer Fred Hoenemann got a temporary
injunction Prohibiting Pilots From Flying Over His Farm.

July 30, 1942 President Franklin Roosevelt signed a bill creating
the navy Waves (Women accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service).

July 30, 1952 The Chesapeake Bay Bridge--third longest in the world--opened.

Book (1) writes about it in "Down by the bay-Tell your (children) that the Chesapeake Bay--which is 200 miles long and 4 to 40 miles wide--is the largest inlet on the Atlantic coast of the United States. Have the children locate the Chesapeake Bay on a U.S. Map. Various rivers flow into the bay. Challenge the kids to find as many as they can. (Among the rivers are the James, York, Potomac, Rappahannock, Patuxent, and Susquehanna.)"

July 30, 1956 Congress adopted the motto, "In God We Trust."

Book (1) writes in "National motto- Ask your (children) where the motto "In God We Trust" can be found--for example, on coins and paper currency. Then discuss the concept of mottoes and why they exist. What is your state's motto? Ask each (child) to adopt a personal motto, write it on a sheet of oaktag, and add a personalized border design. Tape the mottoes (onto something to display them.)"

July 30, 1971 Apollo 15 astronauts landed on the moon.
Their mission included deploying a jeeplike vehicle called
a Lunar Rover, which enabled them to explore much more
of the moon's surface.



This is the last day of July and the last day on this blog. Grandma will carry on tomorrow into August. This is also a very special sons birthday.) Therefore, we will start July 31 with the only two birthdays:

July 31, 1803 John Ericsson, Swedish-American engineer
who designed the Monitor, the famous Ironclad Civil War
ship, was born.

July 31, 1930 Robert Kimmel Smith, children's author, was born.

Now moving on into the Events for the day:

July 31, 1498 Christopher Columbus first sighted Trinidad.

July 31, 1790 The First American Patent was awarded to Samuel
Hopkins for his method of making potash, a substance used in
the manufacture of soap and glass.


Book (1) writes in "Products and patents-Explain to younger (children) that when a new product is invented, the inventor can apply for a special number so that no one else can take credit for the product or make money from it without the inventor's approval. Then encourage the children to look through (their ) toys and supplies to find patent numbers. For homework, have them find patent numbers on household products."

July 31, 1792 The cornerstone for the U.S. Mint--The First Official
Building Constructed by the U.S. Government--was laid in Philadelphia.

Book (1) writes "Discovering cornerstones-Tell your (children) that besides helping support a building, a cornerstone has ceremonial and historical significance. Cornerstones typically are laid during dedication ceremonies. Many are inscribed with the date construction was begun or completed as well as with the names of those involved in the construction process--architects, builders, government officials, and so on. Some cornerstones are used as time capsules. They are hollowed out, then filled with important documents and other interesting items. Can your (children) find (a cornerstone somewhere on an official building in your town or city)? If (something was being built today, what objects might the children include in a cornerstone time capsule? Make a ...list."

July 31, 1845 The Saxophone was officially introduced to the
military bands of the French army.

July 31, 1948 President Harry Truman dedicated New York
International Airport at Idlewild, Queens. (It was later renamed
John F. Kennedy International Airport.)

Book (1) writes in "International Airport Sweep-Engage your (children) in an "international airport sweeep." Have each child select 10 to 15 major U.S. or international cities noted in a newspaper weather listing. Then have the kids research the names and locations of international airports in or near their selected cities. (The children) can use such sources as trael brochures, almanacs, city guides, and maps to find the information. Finally, have your (children) each map out a flight path connecting all the international airports they've chosen, then calculate the total mileage."

July 1964 The U.S. space probe Ranger 7 transmitted 4,308 close-up photographs of the moon before crashing. The photos showed a thousand times more detail than any previous view through telescopes on earth. (Do some research because Grandma was either directed to some interesting information about information they were holding from us, so do some heavy research.)

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